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Fifth Match, 1834 La Bourdonnais-McDonnell Matches
Researched by Nick Pope

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 McDonnell0101000100104
 Drawn1           1

A Selection Of Games Played At The Westminster Club.

This game occurred between La Bourdonnais and M—, the latter playing the White men. It is evident that he cannot do better, in the finale, than draw the game by persisting the check.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.1 (65)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 Bb6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 d6 9.h3 h6 10.Nc3 Nge7 11.Bb2 0-0 12.Ne2 Ng6 13.Ng3 Kh8 14.Qc2 Nh4 15.Nxh4 Qxh4 16.Rad1 Bd7 17.Kh2 f5 18.d5 Ne5 19.Bxe5 dxe5 20.exf5 Qf4 21.Bd3 Rae8 22.Rde1 Qb4
CPC: With the object of taking 23...Bxf2.
23.Re4 Qd6 24.Rg4 Qxd5 25.Nh5 Re7 26.f6 gxf6 27.Qc1
CPC: 27.Bc4 would perhaps have been better play; he might also have taken 27.Nxf6, and then have played 28.Bc4.
Studies: 27.Rg6 (perhaps).
27...Bxg4 28.Qxh6+ Kg8 29.Qg6+ Kh8 ½-½
Bell's: White draws by perpetually checking on h6 and g6; for Black cannot interpose rook without being mated.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.2 (66)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bc5 6.0-0 Bb6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 d6 9.h3 h6 10.Bb2 Qe7
CPC: 10...Nf6 would have been better play.
11.e5 dxe5 12.Ba3
Lewis: Playing 12.d5 would give a stronger attack.
12...Qf6 13.Re1 Bd7 14.dxe5 Qf5 15.Nc3 0-0-0 16.Nd5 Be6 17.Bd3 Rxd5
CPC: If Black had moved 17...Qh5, White by playing 18.Nf4, would still have gained the exchange.
18.Bxf5 Rxd1 19.Bxe6+ fxe6 20.Raxd1 Nge7 21.Rd3 Nd5 22.g3 g5 23.Kg2 Rg8 24.Re4 a5 25.Ne1 Ncb4 26.Bxb4 axb4 27.a3 bxa3 28.Rxa3 Kd7 29.Rf3 c5 30.Rf7+ Kc6 31.Rh7 Rg6 32.h4 gxh4 33.Rxh4 Ba5 34.Nf3 Nc7
CPC: We should have preferred advancing 34...b5.
35.R7xh6 Rg7 36.Kf1 b5 37.Ke2 Kd5
CPC: Playing 37...b4, appears to us to have been his only chance of redeeming the game.
38.Rh7 Rg8
CPC: He should have exchanged rooks, and then pushed forward his pawns.
39.Rd7+ Kc6 40.Rd6+ Kb7 41.Rh7 b4 42.Nd2 Ra8 43.Rxe6 Bb6 44.Nc4 Ra2+ 45.Kd3 Ba7 46.Rf6 Ra1 47.e6 Re1 48.e7 b3 49.Na5+ Kc8 50.Rf8+ Ne8 51.Rxe8+ Kc7 52.Nxb3 1-0

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.3 (67)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5
Palamède: C'est la meilleure place pour retirer le fou. {This is the best place to move the bishop.}
6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5
Palamède: Le fou de la reine à la deuxième case de son cavalier eût été un meilleur coup d'attaque. {9.Bb2 would have been a better attacking move.}
9...Na5
Palamède: Le noirs, en jouant ce cavalier à cette case, le rendent inutile pour toute la partie; il fallait le jouer à deuxième case de leur roi, et ils avaient une bonne partie. {Black, playing the knight to this square, makes it useless for the entire game; it was necessary to play 9...Ne7, and would have had a good game.}
10.Bd3 Nf6 11.Nc3 0-0 12.h3 h6 13.Kh2
Palamède: Les blancs jouent leur roi à cette case pour se préparer à pousser deux pas le pion du fou du roi. {White plays the king to this square to prepare the push of the f-pawn.}
13...c5 14.Nd2 Bd7 15.Qe1
Palamède: Ils jouent leur dame à cette case dans l'intention de la porter dans le jeu de l'adversaire lorsqu'ils auront poussé le pion du fou du roi. {The queen is moved to this square with the intention taking the game to the opponent when they push the f-pawn.}
15...g5
Palamède: Ce coup est mal joué, il découvre le roi et l'expose beaucoup. {This is a bad move, as it uncovers the king and exposes much.}
16.f4 gxf4 17.Rxf4 c4
Palamède: Les noirs sacrifient pour dégager leur cavalier, qui dans sa position est inutile, et pour détourner l'attaque que les blancs forment sur le roi; les blancs pour-raient prendre le pion et conserver toujours un beau jeu, mais ils jouent mieux en retirant leur fou. {Black sacrifices to release the knight, who in this position is worthless, and to divert the attack that White forms on the king; White could take the pawn and still maintain a good game, but the better move was moving the bishop.}
18.Bc2 Bd4
Palamède: Les noirs, en attaquant ce cavalier, espèrent pouvoir pousser le pion du cavalier de leur reine et se servir enfin de leur cavalier. {Black, attacking the knight, hopes to push the b-pawn and finally make use of their knight.}
19.Nf3 Bxc3
Palamède: Les noirs, en prenant le cavalier, placent la reine des blancs dans une bonne position pour l'attaque. {Black, by taking the knight, put White's queen in a good position to attack.}
20.Qxc3 Nh5 21.Rh4 Ng7 22.Bxh6 f6 23.Bxg7 Kxg7
24.e5
Palamède: Coup bien joué. {Well played move.}
24...fxe5 25.Rh7+ Kg8 26.Nxe5
Palamède: Le sacrifice du cavalier est très-bon, l'on ne peut le prendre sans perdre de suite la partie. {The sacrifice of the knight is very good, we cannot take without losing the game.}
26...Bf5
Lewis: From this position the checkmate is forced in four moves, at most; for example: 27.Nf7 Qf6 28.Qxf6 Kxh7 29.Bxf5+ Kg8 30.Nh6#.
27.Nf7
Palamède: Sur ce coup, quelle que soit la défense des noirs, ils sont mat. {With this move, whatever the defense of Black, they are mated.}
27...Bxh7 28.Nh6# 1-0

Selection Of Games Player In The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.4 (68)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 Nc6 3.Nf3 e6 4.c3 d5 5.e5 f6 6.Bd3 Nh6 7.Bc2 Bd7 8.0-0 Qb6 9.d4 0-0-0 10.Kh1 Ng4 11.a3 Kb8 12.b4 cxb4 13.cxb4 Be7 14.Nc3 Rdf8 15.Na4 Qc7 16.Nc5 Bxc5 17.bxc5 g5 18.h3 h5
Bell's: Judiciously leaving knight en prise. As sapient Hoyle observes, "Such bold attempts make the finest games;" and, with equal truth, Cocker teaches us that "two and two make four."
CPC: Well played.
19.Kg1 gxf4 20.hxg4 hxg4 21.Ne1 fxe5 22.Bb2 g3 23.dxe5 Nxe5 24.Nf3 Nxf3+ 25.Rxf3 Rh4 26.Qd2 Qxc5+
CPC: It would have been better play, we believe, to have advanced 26...e5 at this point.
27.Bd4 Qe7
CPC: On looking superficially at this position, it appears that Black might have forced the game in a few moves, by playing 27...Rfh8; the following variation, however, shows that he would have lost by so doing. 27...Rfh8 28.Qxf4+ Rxf4 (apparently his best move) 29.Bxc5 and notwithstanding Black's advantage in pawns, White has the better game.
28.Qa5
Bell's: The possibility of setting up this potent counter-attack destroys the attack acquired by Black, through the latter's gallant sacrifice of knight.
28...a6 29.Rb1 Bb5 30.Rxb5
Bell's: If he retake rook, you win immediately by checking with bishop.
30...Rfh8
Bell's: Desperate, under the strong fire directed against his king; he leaves everything on that side to chance, and offers checkmate with rook.
31.Bxh8 Rh1+ 32.Kxh1 Qh4+ 33.Kg1 Qh2+ 34.Kf1 Qh1+ 35.Ke2 Qxg2+ 36.Ke1 Qh1+ 37.Kd2 Qxh8 38.Qxa6 Qh2+ 39.Kc1 1-0
Bell's: Black surrendered. The game, on the whole, is good and instructive. Black rushed on to his own attack, without sufficiently providing means of defence at home. White, like Hannibal, carries the attack into his enemy's country, and furnishes a strong example of what we so much and constantly endeavour to impress on the minds of all chess students—"The strongest defence is counter-attack."

Selection Of Games Played In The Westerminster Chess Club.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.5 (69)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bc5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5 Na5 10.Bd3 Nf6 11.h3 h6 12.Nc3 0-0 13.Kh1 Nh7 14.Qc2 f5 15.exf5 c5 16.g4 a6 17.Bf4 Ba7 18.a4 c4 19.Be4 Nb3 20.Rae1 Nc5 21.Nd4 Nxe4 22.Rxe4 Qh4 23.Kg2 Ng5 24.Bxg5 Qxg5 25.f4 Qh4 26.Ne6 Bxe6 27.dxe6 h5 28.Qe2 hxg4 29.hxg4 b5 30.Nd5 Rfc8 31.e7 Kf7 32.Rh1 1-0
Bell's: This last move bothers Black's queen "a few," and the game is not worth carrying further. The defence is feebly conducted, but, without a weak defence, how could we ever enjoy witnessing a similar specimen of clever attack? Occasional bad moves render a game interesting, and give a colouring on the otherwise sombre scene. As the old woman said of the loaves produced by the Metropolitan Bread Company, in which the vapour is drawn off and condensed into alcohol, leaving the residuum of the nature and consistency of a deal board, "None of your new-fangled baking for me; I likes my bread with the gin in it!"

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.6 (70)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 Nc6 3.c3 e6 4.Nf3 d5 5.e5 Qb6 6.Bd3 f6 7.Bc2 Nh6 8.0-0 Nf7 9.Kh1 Bd7 10.d4 Be7
CPM: And Black can castle on either side with a good game.
11.a3 a5 12.b3 f5 13.Be3 0-0 14.Nbd2 Rfc8 15.h3 Kh8 16.g4 g6 17.Rg1 cxd4 18.cxd4 g5 19.gxf5 exf5 20.fxg5 Ncxe5 21.Nxe5 Nxe5 22.Ra2 Ng6 23.Nf3 Qe6 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.dxe5 Rc3 26.Rg3 Rac8 27.Bb1 Be8 28.Rf2 Bg6 29.b4 axb4 30.axb4 Rxe3 31.Rxe3 Bxg5 32.Re1 Rc1 33.Qxc1 Bxc1 34.Rxc1 Qxe5 35.Rcf1 d4 36.Bxf5 Bxf5 37.Rxf5 Qe4+ 38.Kg1 d3 39.Rf8+ Kg7 40.R1f6 Qd4+ 41.Kf1 Qxf6+ 42.Rxf6 Kxf6 43.Kf2 Ke5 44.Ke3 d2 45.Kxd2 Kd4 46.b5 Kc5 47.Kc3 Kxb5 48.Kb3 h5 0-1

Greenwood Walker gives this game as McDonnell-Bourdonnais. The Chess Player's Chronicle follows Greenwood Walker, but Chess Studies gives Bourdonnais-McDonnell.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.7 (71)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5 Na5 10.Bd3 Nf6 11.h3 0-0 12.Kh1 c6 13.Na3 h6 14.Bf4 cxd5 15.exd5 Bc7 16.Qd2 Nh7 17.Nb5 b6 18.Bxh7+ Kxh7 19.Qc2+ f5 20.Qxc7 Qxc7 21.Nxc7 1-0

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.8 (72)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bc5
Palamède: Ce coup n'est pas très-bon, car lorsque votre adversaire a roqué, il peut pousser deux pas son pion de la reine sur ce fou et gagner un temps. Il faut mieux retirer ce fou à la quatrième case de la tour de la reine. {This move is not very good, because when your opponent has castled, he can push his d-pawn two squares and gain time. It is better to move this bishop to a5.}
6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.h3 h6
Palamède: C'est un mauvais coup et un temps perdu dans un moment dangereux. {This is a bad move and loses time at a dangerous moment.}
10.Bb2
Palamède: Bon coup d'attaque. {Good attacking move.}
10...Qe7
Palamède: Mauvais coup qui détermine la perte de la partie. {Bad move that determines the loss of the game.}
11.e5 dxe5 12.d5
Palamède: Les blancs jouent beaucoup mieux en poussant que s'ils avaient repris le pion. {White's play of pushing the pawns is much better than taking the pawn.}
12...Na5 13.Nxe5 Nf6 14.d6
Palamède: Coup d'attacque très-important à jouer. {Very important attacking move to play.}
14...cxd6 15.Bxf7+ Kd8 16.Re1 Kc7 17.Na3 a6 18.Rc1+ Bc5
Palamède: Très-mauvais coup de defense qui fait perdre plus vite les noirs. {Very bad move from the defense that loses faster for Black.}
19.Rxc5+ dxc5 20.Nec4 Qd8 21.Be5+ Kc6 22.Qf3+ Nd5 23.Bxd5+ Kd7
Palamède: Les blancs ne peuvent prendre le fou sans perdre leur reine. {Black cannot take the bishop without losing the queen.}
24.Qf5+ Ke8 25.Qf7# 1-0

Lewis correctly gives the game as White (Bourdonnais)-Black (McDonnell). Greenwood incorrectly gives the game as McDonnell-Bourdonnais. Le Palamède, edited by Bourdonnais, the Chess Player's Chronicle and Chess Studies all follow Lewis. Also, Bell's only gives 29 moves and states "the remainder was unhappily not preserved" even though it was given as complete previously by Lewis and subsequently by Greenwood Walker.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.9 (73)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bc5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5 Nce7
Bell's: It would be stronger to move 9...Na5.
10.e5 Ng6 11.Bb2 dxe5 12.Bxe5 Nf6 13.Bxf6 Qxf6 14.Re1+
Palamède: Ce coup déroque les noirs et donne la position aux blancs. {Allowing this rook move Black gives the position to White.}
14...Kf8
Bell's: There are difficulties attendant on either move; but, on account of the mode in which Black crowds his h-rook, we should have preferred the alternative of placing 14.Ne7.
15.Nbd2 Bf5 16.Qb3 h6 17.a4 Rb8 18.a5 Bc5 19.Bd3 Nf4 20.Bxf5 Qxf5 21.Ne4 Qg4 22.g3 Nh3+ 23.Kg2 Bd6 24.Nxd6 cxd6 25.Ra4
Bell's: Played with great judgment and power.
25...Qd7 26.Rh4 g5
Bell's: If he retreat 26....Ng5, you take it 27.Nxg5, and he dare not retake.
Palamède: Les noirs, en laissant trop long-temps leur C à la 6 c. de la T du R, sont obligés de perdre un pion pour sauver la pièce. {Black, in leaving the knight too long on h3, is forced to lose a pawn to save the piece.}
27.Rxh3 g4 28.Rh4 gxf3+ 29.Qxf3
Bell's: This game was won, after many moves, by White; but the remainder was unhappily not preserved.
29...Qb5 30.Rhe4
CPC: If White, instead of playing 30.Rhe4, had moved 30.Qf6, he could hardly have failed to win the game in a few moves, ex. gr. 30.Qf6 Qxd5+ (apparently his best move) 31.Kg1 Rh7 (or 31...Rg8 32.Qxh6+ Rg7 33.Rg4 and wins) 32.Rg4 Re8 (his only move to prevent immediate mate) 33.Rg8+ Kxg8 34.Rxe8#.
30...Rh7 31.Qf5 Rg7 32.Re7 Qxa5 33.Rxb7
Palamède: L'on ne peut prendre cette tour sans être mat. {He cannot take the rook without being mated.}
CPC: Finely played.
33...Qd8 34.Rxa7 Qg5 35.Qxg5 Rxg5 36.Ree7 Rf5 37.g4 Rf6
Palamède: Cette Partie a eu encore un grand nombre de coups; les blancs sont parvenus à la gagner grâce à un pion de plus. {The game continued for a great number of moves; White managed to win thanks to a pawn more.}
38.Re2 Rb5 39.Rd2 Kg7 40.Rd7 Rb4 41.h3 Kg6 42.Rd3 Rc4 43.f3 Ra4 44.Kg3 Rb4 45.h4 Ra4 46.Rd8 Kg7 47.Re3 Ra6 48.Ree8 Rg6 49.Re7 Kf6 50.Rdd7 Rg7 51.Re3 Rb6 52.f4 Rh7 53.h5 Rg7 54.Kh4 Ra6 55.Rf3 Rb6 56.Rc3 Rg8 57.Rc6 Rxc6 58.dxc6 Ke6 59.f5+ Ke5 60.c7 Rc8 61.Rxf7 d5 62.Rd7
CPC: Had he advanced 62.g4, Black, after taking 62...hxg4, would probably have moved 63...Kd6, but in whatever way he played, White must have won without difficulty.
Studies: 62.g4 wins.
62...d4 63.g5 Kxf5 64.g6 Ke6 65.Rxd4 Rxc7 66.Rf4 Ra7 67.Rf8 Ra4+ 68.Kg3 Ra3+ 69.Kf4 Ra4+ 70.Ke3 Ra3+ 71.Kd4 Ra4+ 72.Kc3 Ra3+ 73.Kc4 Ra4+ 74.Kb3 Rg4 75.Rh8 Kf6 76.Rxh6 Kg7 77.Rh7+ Kg8 78.Kc3 Rh4 79.Kd3 Rb4 80.Ke3 Ra4 81.Kf3 Rb4 82.Kg3 Ra4 83.Rf7 Rb4 84.Rf4 Rb1 85.Kg4 Rg1+ 86.Kh4 Kg7 87.Rf7+ Kg8 88.Rf3 Kg7 89.Rg3 Ra1 90.Rg4 Rb1 91.Re4 Rg1 92.Re3 Kh6 93.Re7 Rh1+
Lewis: The previous move of White gives Black an opportunity of drawing the game; but of which he does not avail himself. Instead of checking 93...Rh1+, he ought to check 93...Rg4+; White cannot take, without giving a stalemate; he, therefore, moves 94.Kh3, and Black checks 94...Rh4+, winning the pawns, or forcing the stalemate.
CPC: Black might have drawn the game at this point, by checking 93...Rg4+; White could not have taken the rook without giving stalemate, and upon his moving 94.Kh3; Black would have checked 94...Rh4+, winning the pawns or compelling his opponent to stalemate him.
Studies: 93...Rg4+ draws.
94.Kg4 Rg1+ 95.Kf5 Rf1+ 96.Ke6 Kxh5 97.g7 Rg1 98.Kf7 Rf1+ 99.Ke8 Rg1 100.Kf8 1-0

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.10 (74)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 Nc6 3.Nf3 e6 4.c3 d5 5.e5 f6 6.Bd3 Qb6 7.Bc2 Bd7 8.0-0 Nh6 9.Kh1 Be7 10.d4 0-0 11.a3 a5 12.h3 f5 13.g4
CPC: White compromises his game by this move.
13...fxg4 14.hxg4 Be8
CPC: Much better play than taking 14...Nxg4.
15.f5 Nxg4 16.f6 gxf6 17.exf6 Bxf6 18.Rg1 h5 19.Qd3
Bell's: Too palpable to succeed, except against a very beginner.
19...Qc7 20.Bh6 c4 21.Qe2 Bg7 22.Bxg7 Rxf3
Bell's: Well played; for, if you take 23.Qxf3, he gives mate 23...Qh2#.
CPC: Well played.
23.Rxg4 hxg4 24.Qxe6+ Qf7 25.Qxf7+ Bxf7 0-1
Bell's: Black was the victor, though White protracted defeat for many moves. Black has won the exchange, and has not only a pawn to boot, but the whole field open to the range of his men.

Games Played By First-Rate Players In The Westminster Club.—[...]
[A third Game by the same players.]

Chess.—The three games in our Paper of the 25th of Jan. were played by La Bourdonnais against Mr. M., the former playing the White.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.11 (75)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Bb2 Nf6 10.e5 dxe5 11.d5 Ne7 12.Bxe5 0-0
Bell's: It would seem to be dangerous, to say the least of it, thus to allow White to break up the pawns on the king's side by 13.Bxf6.
13.Bxf6 gxf6 14.Nc3 f5 15.Qd2 Kh8 16.Rae1 Ng6 17.Qh6 Qf6 18.Ne5
Bell's: It would be useless to offer mate by moving 18.Ng5.
18...Qg7 19.Nxg6+ fxg6 20.Qxg7+ Kxg7 21.Re7+ Kh6 22.Nb5 c6 23.dxc6 bxc6 24.Nd6 Bc5 25.Nf7+ Kg7 26.Rc7 Bb6 27.Re7 Kf6 28.Rfe1 Ba5 29.R1e2 Rb8 30.h4 Rb1+ 31.Kh2 Bb4 32.Rc7 Rc1
Bell's: In order, should you take 33.Rxc6, to take 33...Rxf7, if presently convenient.
33.Rxc6+
Bell's: White, seeing that he takes the pawn with check, imagines he can afterwards extricate his knight with safety. It is true, he can do so; but his bishop and rook will remain under embarrassment, and fatally so.
33...Kg7 34.Ng5 Bd7 35.Ne6+ Kh6 36.Ra6 Rxc4 37.Nxf8 Bxf8 38.Rxa7 Rxh4+ 39.Kg3 f4+
Bell's: If 40.Rxh4, Black gives mate with g-pawn.
40.Kf3 Bc6+
Bell's: Might also check with 40...Bg4+.
41.Re4 Bxe4+ 42.Kxe4 Bc5 0-1
Bell's: White gave up the game. He had a strong attack in the commencement, and looked for a long time like winning. Black played the last half of the game in a masterly style.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fifth Match
Round: 5.12 (76)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.e5 Nc6 5.c3 f6 6.Bd3 Nh6 7.Bc2 Qb6 8.0-0 Nf7 9.d4 Bd7
Studies: 9...cxd4 10.cxd4 Nxd4 11.Nxd4 Bc5 12.Be3 Qxb2 etc.
10.Kh1 Be7 11.a3 a5 12.h3 f5 13.b3 h5 14.Be3 Rc8 15.Nbd2 cxd4 16.cxd4 g5
CPC: This is a well played move.
17.fxg5 Ncxe5 18.Nxe5 Nxe5 19.Re1 Ng6 20.Nf3 Kf7 21.Ra2 Bd6 22.Ne5+ Bxe5 23.dxe5 Qc7 24.Bd4 Qd8 25.Qd2 h4 26.b4 a4 27.Qe3
CPC: Threatening to take 28.Bxf5, and then to advance 29.e6+.
27...Re8 28.Bb1
Studies: 28.Bd1.
28...Qe7 29.Rf2 Kg8 30.g4 hxg3 31.Qxg3 Rc4 32.Bc5 Qh7 33.Rh2 Bc6 34.Kg1 Qh5 35.Rd2 Nh4 36.Kf2 d4 37.Rd3 Rd8 38.g6 Rd7 39.Red1 Be4 40.R3d2 Bxb1 41.Rxb1 Rc3 42.Rd3 Rc2+ 43.Kf1 Rg2
CPC: The errors at this point of the game, in Greenwood Walker's edition, must have rendered the remaining moves quite incomprehensible to young players.
44.Qe1 Qg5 45.Qxh4 Qxh4 46.Kxg2 Qe4+ 47.Rf3 Qxb1 48.h4 Qe4 49.h5 d3 50.h6 d2 51.h7+ Kh8 52.Bf8 Qxf3+ 53.Kxf3 d1Q+ 0-1

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