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Third Match, 1834 La Bourdonnais-McDonnell Matches
Researched by Nick Pope

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 Drawn 1          1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.1 (35)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C37] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 g4 5.Nc3
CPC: We are indebted to Mr. M'Donnell for bringing this variation of the attack into vogue.
Ledger: A variation of the Muzio for which we are indebted to M'Donnell's inventive genius. It is not, when properly met, so advantageous for the first player as the more customary moves of 5.0-0 or 5.d4; but may well be adopted for variety's sake, and will be found productive of highly interesting positions.
5...gxf3 6.Qxf3 Qf6
Palamède: Mauvais coup de défense. {Bad defensive move.}
Ledger: This is far from being a good move. The "coup juste" at this point, as afterwards recommended by Labourdonnais himself, is 6...d5. White's best play is 7.Bxd5, whereupon Black follows with 7...c6, and will be enabled speedily to develop his forces and maintain his numerical superiority.
7.Nd5 Qe5 8.c3 Bh6 9.d4 Qd6 10.e5 Qc6 11.Bb5 Qg6
Palamède: L'on ne peut prendre le F sans perdre la D. {He could not take the bishop without losing the queen.}
CPC: The young player, on examining the position, will readily see that Black would have lost his queen had he taken the bishop.
12.Nxc7+ Kd8 13.Nxa8 Ne7 14.0-0 Rg8 15.Bd3 Qg7 16.b4
Palamède: Pour dégager le cavalier. {To free the knight.}
Ledger: The purpose of this and the subsequent advance of the b-pawn is to liberate the confined knight.
16...Ng6 17.Bxg6 Qxg6 18.b5 d6 19.b6 a6 20.exd6 Nc6
Palamède: Dans cette position les noirs ont un pion et un échange de plus; ils ont gagné la partie, qui a été fort longue et n'a pas offert un grand intérêt. {In this position White is up a pawn and the exchange; he won the game, which was very long and did not offer great interest.}
21.d7 Bxd7 22.Nc7 Bg4 23.Qd5+ Kc8
24.Bxf4
CPC: This move is full of peril, and might have cost White the game.
Ledger: This ill-considered move loses White a piece, and but for the strength of his pawns, would have cost him the game.
24...Be6 25.Nxe6 fxe6 26.Qf3 Bxf4 27.Rae1 e5 28.Kh1 Qh6 29.Qh3+
Ledger: Very well played. Although Black has two pieces for a rook, the strength of White's pawns and general position more than counterbalance the inferiority.
29...Qxh3 30.gxh3 Bd2 31.Rd1 Bxc3 32.d5 Ne7 33.Rf7
Ledger: White might have won the bishop and knight for a rook and pawn, by moving 33.Rc1. The play selected instead will be found much more decisive in its results.
33...Bb4 34.d6 Nc6 35.Rc7+ Kb8 36.Rxh7 e4 37.Rh4 e3 38.Re4 Bc5 39.d7 Rd8 40.h4 Bxb6 41.h5 Kc7 42.h6 e2
Ledger: The only move to prolong the game.
43.Rxe2 Bd4 44.h7 Kxd7 45.Rg2 Rh8 46.Rg7+ Kd6 47.Rxb7 Kc5 48.Kg2 Nd8 49.Rd7 Ne6 50.h4 Kc6 51.R7xd4 Nxd4 52.Rxd4 Rxh7 53.Kg3 Kc5 54.Rd2 a5 55.Kg4 a4 56.Rd3
Studies: 56.h5.
Ledger: 56.h5 was the correct play, and would have shortened the contest. The game was protracted to one hundred moves, M'Donnell not conducting the termination as well as the earlier stages of the "partie."
56...Rb7 57.h5 Rb4+ 58.Kg3 Rb1 59.Rd2 Rg1+ 60.Rg2 Rh1 61.Rh2 Rg1+ 62.Kh4 Rg8 63.h6 Kb4 64.Kh5 Ka3 65.h7 Rb8 66.Kg5
CPC: By playing 66.Rg2, White could have won the game in a few moves.
Studies: 66.Rg2 wins.
66...Rb5+ 67.Kf4 Rb8 68.Ke4 Re8+ 69.Kd3 Rd8+ 70.Kc2 Rh8 71.Kb1 Kb4 72.Rh4+ Kc3 73.Rh3+ Kc4 74.Kb2 Kb4 75.a3+ Kc4 76.Rh4+ Kb5 77.Kc3 Rc8+ 78.Kb2 Rh8 79.Rb4+ Ka5 80.Rb7 Ka6 81.Rg7 Ka5 82.Kc3 Rc8+ 83.Kd4 Rh8 84.Rg5+ Kb6 85.Rh5 Kc6 86.Kc4 Kb6 87.Kb4 Kc6 88.Kxa4 Kb6 89.Rh6+ Kc5 90.Ka5 Ra8+ 91.Ra6 Rb8 92.a4 Rc8 93.Ra7 Rb8 94.Rc7+ Kd6 95.Rc1 Ra8+ 96.Kb5 Rb8+ 97.Ka6 Ra8+ 98.Kb7 Rh8 99.a5 1-0
CPC: This game is remarkably well played by Mr. M'Donnell.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.2 (36)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C53] Italian
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 d6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.d5 Ne5 9.Nxe5 dxe5 10.Bg5 a6 11.Qf3 Qd6 12.Bxf6 Qxf6 13.Qxf6 gxf6 14.0-0-0
CPC: The advantage to accrue from the sacrifice of the f-pawn is not obvious.
14...Bxf2 15.Rhf1 Be3+ 16.Kc2 Rg8 17.g3 Rg6 18.d6
CPC: The advance of this pawn, with the three or four consequent moves, is skilfully conceived.
18...c6 19.Bxf7+ Kxf7 20.d7 Bxd7 21.Rxd7+ Ke6 22.Rxh7 Rh6 23.Rxh6 Bxh6 24.Rd1 b5 25.Ne2 a5 26.g4 Rg8 27.h3 c5 28.Rd3
CPC: To prevent 28...Be3, and afterwards to 29...Bd4.
28...Rc8 29.Ng3 b4 30.Nf5 Bf8 31.h4 a4 32.h5 c4 33.Rh3 b3+ 34.axb3 cxb3+ 35.Kb1 Kf7 36.h6 Kg8 37.h7+ Kh8 38.Ne3 a3 39.bxa3 Bxa3
CPC: Instead of this move, we believe Black should have played 39...Rc3, with the object of winning the knight.
40.Rh1 b2
Lewis: If, instead of this move, he had played 40...Rc3, I think he might have won the game.
Studies: 40...Rc3 wins.
41.Nc2 Be7 42.Kxb2 Rc4 43.Re1 Kxh7 44.Kb3 Rc8 45.Ne3 Kg6 46.Rf1 Rh8 47.Rf3 Rc8 48.Nd5 Bd8 49.Rf5 Rc1 ½-½

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.3 (37)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Be7
Palamède: Le F du R à la 3 c. de sa D etait preférable. {6....Bd6 was preferable.}
7.Nf3 0-0 8.Be3 c6 9.h3 Nbd7 10.0-0 Nb6 11.Bb3 Nfd5 12.Qe2 f5 13.Rae1 g5
Palamède: Coup dangereux; il découvre le R. {Dangerous move; he exposes the rook.}
14.Bd2 Bf6 15.Ne5 Qe8 16.f4 g4 17.hxg4 fxg4 18.f5 Qh5 19.Bc2
CPC: 19.Ne4, would, we believe, have been stronger play.
19...Qh4 20.Qe4 Kh8 21.Nxg4 Nc4 22.Nxf6 Qxf6 23.Nxd5 cxd5 24.Qf4 Nxd2 25.Qxd2 Bd7
CPC: If he had taken the pawn, he would have lost a piece.
26.Re5 Rg8 27.Rfe1 Qh4 28.R1e2 Bb5 29.Rf2 Rg4 30.f6 Rxd4 31.Qe3 Rg4 32.Re7 d4 33.Qe5 Rg5
34.f7+
CPC: Finely played.
34...Rxe5 35.f8Q+ Rxf8 36.Rxf8# 1-0

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.4 (38)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [D32] Queen's Gambit Declined
1.d4 e6 2.c4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 c5 5.cxd5 exd5 6.Bg5 Be6 7.e3 Nc6 8.Bd3 Be7 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.0-0 h6 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.Rc1 Bd6 13.Bb5 0-0 14.Nxd5 Qxb2 15.Rb1 Qa3 16.e4 Rad8 17.Nd2 a6 18.Bc4 b5 19.Bb3 Nd4 20.Qh5 Nxb3 21.Nxb3 Qxa2 22.Nd4
Bell's: Generally speaking, the two knights are weaker than the two bishops at the close of a game, but circumstances may give them the best of a position.
22...Qc4 23.Rfd1 Bxd5 24.exd5 Rfe8 25.Rbc1
Bell's: The possibility of thus attacking the queen comes most opportunely. Without it, we should pronounce the Sable's the better situation, independently of their pawn.
25...Qa2 26.Nf5
Bell's: This knight looks mischievous, and your d-pawn is well planted.
26...Qe2
Bell's: This polite invitation to change queens will be, we suspect, as promptly declined as offered.
27.Qh3 b4 28.g4
Bell's: A good bold move.
28...a5
CPC: 28...Bc5 would, perhaps, have been better play.
29.Re1 Qxe1+ 30.Rxe1 Rxe1+
Bell's: We do not fancy several of Black's moves about this part of the game. He seems to have wanted nerve and constancy. The queen is better than the two rooks under present circumstances; you have, besides, a little attack on his king, which, with good nursing, will ripen into "something dangerous."
31.Kg2 a4 32.Qh4 f6 33.Qh5
Bell's: In order to go to g6.
33...Bf8
CPC: We should have preferred playing 33...Rd7.
34.Qg6
Bell's: Threatening to take 35.Nxh6+.
34...Kh8 35.Nxh6
Bell's: Finely imagined; quite as it should be played.
35...gxh6 36.Qxf6+ Kg8 37.Qxd8 a3
Bell's: These pawns will melt away in the presence of your queen, like mist before sunshine.
38.Qa5 Rd1 39.Qa4
Bell's: For if 39...Rxd5, you pin rook.
39...Rd2
CPC: The younger player will perceive that Black must have lost his rook, if he had taken 39...Rxd5.
40.d6 Bxd6 41.Qe8+ Kg7 42.Qd7+ Kf8 43.Qf5+ Kg7 44.g5
Bell's: However he might have parried your previous checks, he could not have prevented your forming a similar combination. If he now takes pawn, he loses rook.
44...Be7 45.Qe5+ Kg6 46.Qe4+ Kf7 47.Qf4+
Bell's: At length, you win the rook by a divergent check. This is mostly the end of situations in which the rook is left to combat the queen.
47...Kg7 48.Qxd2 hxg5 49.Qd5 1-0
Bell's: It is evident that your queen thus posted stops his pawns, and you will finish the affair by bringing up your king, etc. The latter end of this game is the most interesting part of it, and the mode in which White manœuvres his queen deserves dwelling over.
CPC: This game is extremely well played by Mr. M'Donnell.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.5 (39)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Be7 7.Nf3 0-0 8.h3 Nbd7 9.Be3 Nb6 10.Bb3 c6 11.0-0 Nfd5 12.Qe2 f5 13.Ne5 f4 14.Bd2 g5 15.Rae1 Kg7 16.Nxd5 Nxd5 17.Nxc6
CPC: Cleverly played.
17...bxc6 18.Bxd5 Qxd5 19.Qxe7+ Rf7 20.Qb4 Bf5 21.Re5 Qd7 22.d5
CPC: A good move.
22...cxd5 23.Qd4 Kh6 24.h4 Be6 25.Rfe1 Re8 26.Rxg5
CPC: There are few players who would not have preferred taking 26.hxg5; it was, however, much better play to take it, as M. De la Bourdonnais did, with the rook.
26...Ref8 27.Qe5 Bg4 28.Rh5+ Bxh5 29.Qg5# 1-0
CPC: This game is capitally played throughout by M. De la Bourdonnais, but the terminating moves are especially admirable.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.6 (40)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C37] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 g4 5.Nc3 gxf3 6.Qxf3
CPC: 6.0-0 would also have been good play, because, in that case, if Black had taken 6...fxg2, the first player, by taking 7.Bxf7+, must have obtained a powerfully attacking position.
6...Nc6 7.d4 Nxd4 8.Bxf7+ Kxf7 9.Qh5+ Kg7 10.0-0 Ne6 11.Bxf4 Bc5+ 12.Kh1 Nf6 13.Qh6+
CPC: We believe 13.Be5 would have been better play.
13...Kg8 14.Rf3 Bf8 15.Rg3+ Kf7 16.Qh4 Nxf4 17.Qxf4 d6 18.Rf1 Be6 19.Qg5 Ke8
Palamède: Pour éviter l'attaque, les noirs abandonnent une pièce. {To stop the attack, Black gives up a piece.}
CPC: If he had endeavoured to save the knight, he would have lost the game.
20.Rxf6 Qe7 21.Rgf3 c6 22.Ne2
Palamède: Pour revenir en attaque. {To resume the attack.}
22...Rg8 23.Qh5+ Kd8 24.Nd4 Bg4 25.Qa5+
CPC: White might have gained a piece at least, by taking 25.Rxf8+.
25...Kc8
Palamède: L'on ne peut pousser sur la dame sans s'exposer au double échec du cavalier. {He cannot interpose the queen without exposer to the knight fork.}
26.Rf1
CPC: 26.Rf7 although apparently a good move, would not have lessened the difficulties of White's position.
26...Bd7 27.Rf7 Qe8 28.b4
Palamède: Pour découvrir le R de l'adversaire. {To expose the adversary's rook.}
CPC: 28.Ne6 would perhaps have been a better move.
28...b6 29.Qa6+ Kc7 30.Qc4
CPC: A good move.
30...Be7 31.Nxc6
Lewis: This move, though apparently good, is not really so, it would be better play to advance 31.b5.
Palamède: Les blancs avaient une belle position; ils perdent leur partie en prenant ce pion. {White had a beautiful position; he loses the game in taking this pawn.}
CPC: This is far from well played: he ought rather to have checked with 31.Ne6+. It may be proper to remark, that he would have played badly in taking 31.Rxe7, and afterwards moving 32.Rf7, because Black, after taking the first rook, might have advanced 32...d5, and would then have had a winning game.
Studies: 31.b5.
31...b5
Palamède: Joli coup de ressource. {Great resourceful move.}
32.Qxb5 Bxc6 33.Qa5+ Kb8 34.Qf5 Bd8 35.Re1 Qe5 36.Qf3 d5 37.b5 Bb7 38.Rxb7+ Kxb7 39.Qf7+ Bc7 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.7 (41)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Bd6 7.Nf3 0-0 8.h3 Re8+ 9.Be3 Bf4 10.Qd2 Qe7 11.0-0
CPC: A fine stroke of play; far better than protecting the bishop.
11...Bxe3 12.fxe3 Qxe3+
CPC: Black appears to gain considerable advantage by this move, but it was nevertheless a very injudicious one, and tended much towards the loss of the game.
13.Qxe3 Rxe3 14.Ne5 Be6 15.Bxe6 fxe6 16.Kf2 Rxe5 17.dxe5 Nfd7 18.Nb5 Na6 19.Kg3 Nxe5 20.Rae1 Ng6 21.Rxe6 Nc5 22.Re3
CPC: He might safely have taken 22.Nxc7.
22...c6 23.Nd6 b6 24.h4 h6 25.h5 Nf8 26.Re7 Rd8 27.Nb7 Rd3+ 28.Rf3 Rd5
CPC: 28...Rd7 would have prolonged the contest, but ultimate defeat was inevitable.
29.Nxc5 Rxc5 30.Re8 1-0

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.8 (42)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C38] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 Bg7 5.d4 d6 6.c3 Nc6 7.Qb3 Qe7 8.Nxg5
Palamède: Très-joli sacrifice qui donne une forte attaque. {Very pretty sacrifice which gives a strong attack.}
8...Qxg5 9.Bxf7+ Kf8 10.Bxg8 Rxg8 11.Bxf4 Qg6 12.Rf1
Palamède: Si les blancs roquaient au lieu de jouer ce coup, ils étaient mat. {If White castled instead of playing this move, he would be mated.}
12...Bf6 13.Nd2 Ke8 14.0-0-0 Be7 15.e5
Palamède: Pour découvrir le R. {To expose the king.}
15...d5 16.Qxd5 Qxg2 17.Qb3 Nd8 18.d5 c6 19.d6 Be6 20.Nc4 Bf8 21.d7+ Bxd7 22.Nd6+ Bxd6 23.exd6 Rg6 24.Bg3 Qh3 25.Qb4 Re6 26.Qd4 Nf7 27.Rf2 Qh6+ 28.Kb1 Qg6+ 29.Ka1 c5
Palamède: Les noirs sacrifient ce P pour dégager leur T de la D. {Black sacrifices a pawn to free the a-rook.}
30.Qd2 Rf6 31.Bf4 Kf8 32.Rg2 Qh5 33.Re1 Rd8
Palamède: Cette T, jouée à la c. du R, amenait la perte de la partie. {33...Re8 would bring the loss of the game.}
34.Qe3 Be6
Lewis: It would not be good play to move 34...Re6, because White would double the rooks, threatening checkmate.
Palamède: C'est, nous croyons, le meilleur coup de défense. Jouer la T de la D, attaquant la D., l'on était mat en trois coups. Attaquer la D avec la T du R, les blancs auraient laisse leur D en prise et doublé leurs T, placant ainsi les noirs sous un échec et mat. Cette position est belle et fort curieuse. {This is, we believe, the best defensive move. Playing 34...Re8 would be mate in three moves. Attacking the queen with 34...Re6, White would leave his queen en prise and double rooks threatening mate. This position is beautiful and most curious.}
35.Reg1 Ke8 36.Bg5 Rxd6 37.Qg3 Rf3 38.Qe1 Rfd3 39.Bc1 Rd1 40.Rg8+ Kd7 41.Qe4 Qd5 42.Qa4+ Qc6 43.Qxa7 Rxg1 44.Rxg1 Qa6 45.Qxa6 Rxa6 46.a3 Bb3 47.Kb1 Rf6 48.Rg2 Rf1 49.Rg3 c4 50.Rg7 Ke6 51.Rxh7 Ne5 52.Rh6+ Kd7 53.Rh7+ Kc6 54.Rh6+ Kb5 55.Rh5 Re1 56.Rg5 Ka4 57.Rg3 Nd3 58.Rxd3 cxd3 59.h4 d2 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.9 (43)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Bd6 7.Nf3 0-0 8.h3 Re8+ 9.Be3 Nc6 10.0-0 h6 11.a3 Bf5 12.g4
CPC: The advance of this pawn early in the game is seldom unaccompanied with danger; in the present instance it appears particularly exceptionable. We believe White might have played 12.Qb3, with considerable advantage.
12...Bxg4 13.hxg4 Nxg4 14.Qd3 Qf6 15.Kg2 Ne7 16.Ne4
CPC: 16.Nd5 would, perhaps, have been better play.
Studies: 16.Rh1.
16...Qg6 17.Ng3 Nxe3+ 18.Qxe3 Nf5 19.Qd3 Bxg3
CPC: The young player will perceive that Black would have lost his queen if he had taken 19...Nxg3, instead of 19...Bxg3.
20.fxg3 Qxg3+ 21.Kh1 Ne3 22.Bxf7+ Kh8
CPC: He would have played very ill had he taken 22...Kxf7.
23.Qg6 Nxf1 24.Rxf1 Qh3+ 25.Kg1 Re3 26.Rf2
CPC: An ingenious move: we should, however, have preferred playing 26.Bd5.
Studies: 26.Qg2.
26...Rxf3 27.Rg2 Rxf7 28.Qxf7 Qe3+ 29.Qf2 Qxf2+ 30.Rxf2 Rd8 31.Rf4 Rd7 32.Kf2 Kh7 33.Kf3 g5 34.Rf6 Kg7 35.Re6 Rxd4 36.Re7+ Kg6 37.Rxc7 Rd3+ 38.Ke4 Rb3 39.Rc2 h5 40.Rd2 g4 41.Kf4 Rf3+ 42.Ke5 Kg5 43.Rd7 Rb3 44.Rd2 g3 45.Rd8 Kg4 46.Rg8+ Kh3 47.Kf4 h4 0-1
CPC: This game is well played by Mr. M'Donnell.

Greenwood apparently transposes games 3.10 (44) and and 3.11 (45) and Chess Player's Chronicle follows. The sequence is corrected in Chess Studies by George Walker.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.10 (44)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C38] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 Bg7 5.d4 d6 6.c3
CPC: The game is well and carefully opened on both sides. White advances his c-pawn, for the purpose of playing 7.Qb3, and then carrying on the attack as in game no. 42 of the match.
6...h6
CPC: This is much better than bringing out the b-knight, which would have enabled White to play 7.Qb3 with great advantage.
7.Na3 Nc6 8.Bd2 Qe7 9.0-0 Bd7 10.b4 0-0-0 11.Bd3 g4 12.Ne1 f3 13.gxf3 Nf6
CPC: The following mode of play would have given Black a fine attacking game:—13...Nxb4 14.cxb4 Bxd4+ 15.Kh1 Bxa1, etc.
14.b5 Nb8 15.Nac2 Rdg8 16.Kh1 h5 17.Ne3 gxf3 18.Qxf3 Bg4 19.Qf4 Nbd7 20.Nf5 Qe6 21.Nf3 Bxf3+ 22.Qxf3 Ng4 23.a4 Bh6 24.Bxh6 Nxh6 25.a5 Nxf5 26.exf5 Qb3 27.a6
CPC: Mr. M'Donnell exhibits great skill and prudence in the conduct of these pawns, and terminates the game in masterly style.
27...d5 28.c4 Nf6 29.axb7+ Kb8 30.c5 Ng4 31.b6 axb6 32.c6 1-0

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.11 (45)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Bd6 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.0-0 0-0 9.h3 h6 10.a3 Bf5
Palamède: C'est un for bon coup. {This is a good move.}
11.g4
Palamède: Les blancs, en poussant ainsi, découvrent leur roi et s'exposent à un sacrifice qui, dans la positions de la partie, est fort bon. {White, in pushing, uncovers his king exposes himself to a very good sacrifice at this position of the game.}
CPC: Very badly played. The loss of the preceding game in this match was chiefly owing to the premature advance of White's g-pawn.
11...Nxg4 12.hxg4 Bxg4 13.Be2
Palamède: Coup de défense très-faible. {A very weak defensive move.}
13...Bxf3 14.Bxf3 Qh4 15.Re1 Nxd4 16.Ne4
CPC: 16.Re4 would, perhaps, have been more effective.
16...Bh2+ 17.Kf1 Rad8 18.Be3 Nf5 19.Qc2 Qh3+ 20.Bg2 Qg4 21.f3 Qg6 22.Bf2 Ne7 23.Rad1 Nd5 24.Bc5
Palamède: Mal joué de la part des blancs. {Bad move on the part of White.}
24...Qc6 25.Qb3 Nf4
Palamède: Les noirs jouent très-bien en laissant prendre leur tour. {Black play's very well allowing the rook to be taken.}
CPC: This and the subsequent moves by Mr. M'Donnell are cleverly played.
26.Bxf8 Qa6+ 27.Kf2 Rxd1 28.Bf1
Palamède: Il eût mieux valu reprendre la tour avec la dame. Ce coup est très-mauvais. {It would have been better to take 28.Qxd1. This move is very bad.}
CPC: We should have preferred taking 28.Qxd1.
Studies: 28.Qxd1.
28...Bg1+
Palamède: Ce coup est très-ingénieux. Les blancs auraient également perdu, en portant leur roi a la 4ᵉ case du fou de leur roi; les noirs, dans ce cas, auraient donné échec à la 3ᵉ case du cavalier de leur roi, puis ils auraient pris la tour et auraient ainsi gagné la partie. {This move is very ingenious. White was also lost by escaping to f4; Black, in that case, would have given check 28...Qg6+, then he would have taken the rook, and would have thus won the game.}
29.Kxg1 Rxe1 30.Nd2 Qe2 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Third Match
Round: 3.12 (46)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C33] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Qh4+ 4.Kf1 g5 5.Nc3 Bg7 6.d4 d6 7.Nd5 Kd8 8.Be2
Palamède: Pour gèner la retraite de la D. {To hinder the retreat of the queen.}
CPC: A feeble move, which at once gives the attack into the hands of the second player.
8...Nf6 9.Nxf6 Bxf6 10.e5 Be7 11.Qd3 Nc6 12.c3 Bd7 13.g3 Qh6 14.exd6 Bxd6 15.h4 g4
Palamède: Coup bien joué; il retarde la sortie du C du R de l'adversaire. {Well played move; it delays the development of the knight.}
16.Bd1
Palamède: Pour le coup suibant, dégager son C. {In order to next move, free his knight.}
16...Qf6 17.Ke1 Qe7+ 18.Kf2 Re8
Lewis: 18...fxg3+ would probably be better.
Palamède: Prendre le pion par échec eût été meilleur. {18...fxg3+ would have been better.}
CPC: Instead of so playing, we should have preferred taking 18...fxg3+.
Studies: 18...fxg3+.
19.gxf4 Qe1+ 20.Kg2 Qe4+ 21.Qxe4 Rxe4 22.Bc2 Re8 23.Bxh7 Be6 24.Kg3 Bd5 25.Rh2 Re1 26.Ne2 Bc4
CPC: This part of the game is very ingeniously played by M. De la Bourdonnais.
27.d5
Palamède: Seul moyen de sauver le C. {The only way to save the knight.}
27...Ne7 28.Nd4 Nxd5 29.h5 Rg1+
Palamède: Les noirs, en prenant le fou de la reine avec leur tour, puis le pion du fou du roi avec leur fou, auraient pu gagner une pièce, ils ont espéré mieux et ne se sont pas trompés. {Black, taking 29...Rxc1, then 30...Bxf4+, could win a piece, but he hoped for better and was not wrong.}
CPC: He might have gained a piece by taking 29...Rxc1, and then 30...Bxf4+.
30.Kf2 Rf1+ 31.Kg3 Nxf4 32.Kxg4 Kd7 33.b3
Palamède: Pour dégager le fou de la D. {To free the bishop-c1.}
33...Be6+ 34.Nxe6 Nxe6 35.Re2 Rh8 36.Be4 Rg8+ 37.Kh4 Be7+ 38.Kh3 Bd6 39.h6 Rxc1 40.h7 Rxc3+ 41.Kh4 Be7+ 42.Kh5 Rh3# 0-1

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