Chess Archaeology HomeChess is a scientific game and its literature ought to be placed on the basis of the strictest truthfulness, which is the foundation of all scientific research.W. Steinitz

Sixth Match, 1834 La Bourdonnais-McDonnell Matches
Researched by Nick Pope

(Return to Main Index)

Chess Studies: 788859777057880798182838485 
Match Game:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 101112Total
 Bourdonnais0000101010003
 McDonnell1011010101118
 Drawn 1          1

Select Games of Chess, by the First Players of the Day.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.1 (788)
White: NN, suspected to be "McDonnell,A"
Black: NN, suspected to be "Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)"
Opening: [C23] Bishop's Opening
1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Bc5 3.c3 d6 4.d4 exd4 5.cxd4 Bb6 6.Nf3 Nf6 7.Nc3 0-0 8.0-0 Bg4 9.Qd3 Nc6 10.Be3 Bxf3 11.gxf3 Qd7 12.Kh1 Qh3 13.Qd1 Ne7
Bell's: The second player might also take 13...Nxd4 or 13...Bxd4, having in view the perpetual check with queen. Thinking he has the better position, he disdains the draw.
14.Rg1 Ng6 15.Rg3 Qd7 16.f4 Nxe4 17.Nxe4 d5 18.Bd3 dxe4 19.Bxe4 Rad8
Bell's: Leaving b-pawn for a trap.
20.f5 Ne7
Bell's: If Black move 20...Ne5, White probably answers with 21.Qh5.
21.Qg4 g6 22.Rd1 Kh8 23.Bh6 Rg8 24.f6 Qxg4 25.Rxg4 Nd5 26.Bg7+ Rxg7 27.fxg7+ Kxg7 (...) 1-0
Bell's: White was the victor.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.2 (859)
White: NN, suspected to be "Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)"
Black: NN, suspected to be "McDonnell,A"
Opening: [C38] King's Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 Bg7 5.0-0 g4 6.Ne1 f3 7.gxf3 h5 8.f4 d6 9.d4 h4 10.Be3 f5 11.e5 dxe5 12.fxe5 Bxe5 13.Qe2 Bd6 14.Bg5+ Be7 15.Qe5 Rh5 16.Qg7 Rxg5 17.Qf7+ Kd7 18.Qe6+ -

Games Played By First-Rate Players In The Westminster Club.—[...]
Another Game played by the same parties.

Chess.—The three games in our Paper of the 25th of Jan. were played by La Bourdonnais against Mr. M., the former playing the White.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.3 (77)
White: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4
Bell's: Captain Evans's opening is a favourite generally.
4...Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Bb2 Nf6 10.d5 Na5 11.Bd3 0-0 12.Nc3 Bg4 13.h3 Bh5 14.Kh1 Qd7 15.Kh2 Rae8
16.g4
Bell's: Too rash, as will presently appear.
16...Nxg4+ 17.hxg4 Qxg4 18.Be2 Qf4+ 19.Kh1 Bxf3+ 20.Bxf3 f5 21.Bg2 Rf6 22.Qd3 Rh6+ 23.Bh3
Bell's: If 23.Kg1, 23...Qh2#.
23...fxe4 24.Nxe4 Rxe4 25.Bc1
25...Re3
Bell's: This is as finely conceived a move as we have seen for a long time. It forces the game in spite of every thing.
26.Bxe3 0-1
Bell's: And is mated by Black in two moves; and 26.fxe3, the same consequences would have followed.

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.4 (705)
White: NN, suspected to be "McDonnell,A"
Black: NN, suspected to be "Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)"
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Be7 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 Nf6 8.Ng5 d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxf7 Kxf7 11.Qf3+ Ke6
Bell's: Otherwise he loses knight, as you have two pieces bearing on it.
12.Re1 Rf8 13.Qe4 a5 14.a4 b6 15.dxe5 Nb8 16.Rd1 c6 17.Bb3 Bc5 18.c4 Bxf2+
Bell's: This is a false attack, and not of the slightest consequence.
19.Kh1 Bb7 20.cxd5+ cxd5 21.Nc3 Kf7 22.Nxd5 Ke8 23.Qxh7 Bd4 24.Qg6+ Kd7 25.Qg4+ Kc6 26.Qe6+ Kc5 27.Ba3# 1-0
Bell's: This game was determined in favour of White by his judicious sacrifice of the knight at the tenth move. Similar opportunities of making a dash occur to players of all grades, at every hour of the day; but the bad player overlooks what the more experienced hand snatchs with avidity.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.5 (78)
White: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e4 e5 4.d5 f5 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Bxc4 Bc5 7.Nf3 fxe4 8.Ng5 0-0 9.0-0
CPC: White might have gained "the exchange," by 9.d6+; but we think 9.0-0 was safer play.
9...Bd6 10.Ne6
Lewis: Instead of this move, he ought to take 10.Nxe4.
10...Bxe6 11.dxe6 Kh8 12.Bg5 Nc6 13.Nxe4 Qe7 14.Kh1 Rad8 15.Qa4 a6 16.Bd5 Nd4 17.Bxf6 gxf6 18.Bxb7 Qxe6 19.Rae1 f5 20.Nc3
CPC: Threatening to win Black's knight, next move.
20...Qf6 21.Qxa6
CPC: This move places White's queen out of play; 21.Re3 would have been a much better move.
21...e4 22.Qc4 Bxh2
Lewis: This is a good move, for if White were to take 23.Kxh2, Black would win by checking 23...Nf3+ and then playing 24...Qh4+, etc.
CPC: A good move; but we believe that, by first playing 22...Nf3, Black might have forced the game.
23.Re3
CPC: If White had taken 23.Kxh2, he would have been mated in four moves at most.
23...Nf3 24.Rxf3 exf3 25.Kxh2 Rd4 26.Qc5 fxg2
Lewis: Black might now draw the game, by checking with 26...Qh6+, and then playing 27...Rh4.
27.Bxg2 Rg8 28.f4 Qg7 29.Rf2 Rxf4 30.Re2 Rg4 31.Bh3 Rf4 32.Rg2 Qd4 33.Qxd4+ Rxd4 34.Rf2 f4 35.a4 Kg7 36.Bg2 Rf8 37.a5 Rd6 38.Bb7 Rf5 39.a6 f3 40.Kg1 Rg6+
Lewis: 40...Rh6, would be much better, forcing the exchange of a-pawn for f-pawn.
41.Kf1 Rh6 42.Ke1 Rh1+ 43.Kd2 Ra1 44.Kd3 Kf6 45.Nd5+ Kg5 46.Ne3
Lewis: 46.Nxc7 would be better.
46...Rf6 47.Nc4 h5 48.Na3 Rd1+ 49.Kc2 Rd8 50.a7 Kg4 51.a8Q Rxa8 52.Bxa8 Kg3 53.Rf1 Kg2 54.Rd1 c6 55.Bb7 f2 56.Nc4 Re6 57.Nd2 h4 58.b4 h3 59.b5 h2 60.Bxc6+ Kg3 61.Bh1 Rb6 62.Rb1 Rb8 63.b6 1-0

All major sources give this game as Bourdonnais-McDonnell, but Murray suspects it to be misassigned and the supporting evidence concurs. This game appears to have the wrong pairing and was published out of sequence (with game 79) in Chess Studies.

Games Played By The Leading Players Of The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.6 (80)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.h3 h6 10.Bb2 Nge7 11.d5 Na5 12.Bd3 0-0 13.Nc3 Ng6 14.Qd2 c5 15.Na4 f6 16.Nxb6 axb6 17.Rae1 Ne5 18.Nxe5 fxe5 19.f4 exf4 20.Rxf4 Rxf4 21.Qxf4 Qe7 22.Re3 Bd7 23.Rg3 g5 24.h4 Rf8 25.Qd2 g4 26.Qxh6 Qh7 27.Qg5+ Kf7 28.e5 Qg8 29.e6+ Ke8 30.Bg6+ 1-0
Bell's: Lengthened comment is here unnecessary. The second player has a weak game from first to last.

Games Actually Played In The Westminster Club

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.7 (79)
White: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4
Bell's: In this game White sacrifices this pawn, in order to gain an attack by the early development of his pieces. This is called Capt. Evan's Opening, and leads to numerous positions of extraordinary brilliance.
4...Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Bb2 Nf6 10.d5 Na5 11.Bd3 0-0 12.h3 Nh5 13.Qd2 f5 14.exf5 Bxf5 15.Nc3 Bxh3
Bell's: To take 16...Rxf3, should 16.gxh3.
16.Bxh7+ Kh8 17.Bc2 Rxf3 18.gxf3 Qh4
Bell's: Bad play; might have won the game by 18...Nc4. Supposing this is done, and that you should move queen off the black diagonal, Black wins by 19...Qg5+; and should you, instead, retreat 19.Qc1, he attacks 19...Be3+, for, should 20.fxe3, then, Black forces mate in 3 moves. This is a pretty-enough variation.
Studies: 18...Nc4 wins.
19.Ne2
Bell's: To prevent 19...Qg3+.
19...Rf8
Bell's: One bad move is generally enough to spoil a game, but here we have a couple. Black should have played 19...Ng3; but it is to be presumed he overlooked the possibility of checking with queen.
Studies: 19...Ng3.
20.Qh6+
Bell's: The pawn cannot take queen, through your dark-square bishop.
20...Kg8 21.Bh7+
Bell's: If he returns to corner, mate in 2 moves.
CPC: We should have preferred taking 21.Bxg7.
21...Kf7 22.Bg6+ Ke7 23.Qxh5 Qxh5 24.Bxh5 Bxf1 25.Kxf1 Rf5 26.Bg4
CPC: 26.Re1 would, perhaps, have been better play.
26...Rxd5 27.Nf4 Rd2 28.Re1+ Kf8 29.Re2 Rxe2 30.Kxe2 Nc4 31.Ne6+ Kf7 32.Bxg7 c5 33.f4 d5 34.f5 Nd6 35.Be5 Ne8 36.Bh5+ Ke7 37.Bxe8 Kxe8 38.f6 c4 39.Ng5 Bc5 40.f7+ Kd7 41.Bg7 1-0
Bell's: Although disfigured by two successive errors on the part of Black, this game is highly interesting. It could evidently have only been played by two great players, and reminds us of some of the best bits of Greco. We confess we are among those who feel rather glad than otherwise to see that the most skilful "artistes" occasionally "forget their cunning." A game without a blunder is generally but a dull affair.

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.8 (81)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 Nc6 3.c3 e6 4.Nf3 d5 5.e5 f6 6.Bd3 Nh6 7.Bc2 Qb6 8.0-0 Bd7 9.Kh1 Be7 10.d4 f5 11.a3 a5 12.h3 Nf7 13.b3 h5 14.Re1
CPC: With the view to take 15.Bxf5, and then 16.e6.
14...g6 15.Be3 Nh6 16.Nbd2 cxd4 17.cxd4 Kf7 18.Ra2 Rac8 19.Qe2 Kg7
Bell's: This opening is as dry as the sands of Arabia. First-rate players on both sides, they seem to be equally shy of coming to close quarters.
20.Ng5 Nf7
CPC: We should rather have played 20...Nd8.
21.Nxf7 Kxf7 22.Qf2 Kg7 23.Nf3 Nd8 24.Nh4 Nf7 25.Qg3 Rh6 26.Bf2 Bxa3
Bell's: If 27.Rxa3, he captures 27...Rxc2.
CPC: This is far from being a judicious move.
27.Bxf5
Bell's: Played with sound discretion.
27...exf5 28.Rxa3 Be6 29.Rea1 Qb4
Bell's: Then, if 30.Rxa5, he attacks queen with 30...Rc3.
30.Ra4 Qc3 31.Qxc3 Rxc3 32.Rxa5 Rxb3 33.Nf3 Rh8 34.Ra8 Rc8 35.Rxc8 Bxc8 36.Rc1
Bell's: White has fairly out played his adversary, and has decidedly the better position. His pawns, too, are finely posted and united together.
36...Be6 37.Rc7 Rb6 38.Ng5 Kf8 39.Nxe6+ Rxe6 40.Rxb7 Nd8 41.Rb8 Re8 42.Rb5 Ne6 43.g3 Rd8 44.Kg2 h4 45.Kf3 Nc7
CPC: Feebly played. His only chance of redeeming the game was to push 45.g5.
46.Rb6 hxg3 47.Kxg3 Kg7 48.h4 Kf7 1-0
Bell's: White was the conqueror.

Bell's Life in London gives the follow game as a win for the first player, however Greenwood gives this game as a win for McDonnell. The Chess Player's Chronicle and Chess Studies both follow Bell's Life in London.

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.—
[Game played even.]

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.9 (82)
White: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4
Bell's: The sacrifice of this pawn constitutes Captain Evans's opening, which is analysed at great length in Mr. Walker's Treatise on Chess.
4...Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Bb2 Nf6 10.e5 dxe5 11.d5 Na5 12.Bxe5 0-0 13.Bd3 Nxd5 14.Nbd2 Bg4 15.h3
CPC: 15.Qc2 would, perhaps, have been a better move.
15...Bh5 16.Qc2 Bg6 17.Bxg6 fxg6 18.Rad1 Qe8 19.Rfe1 Qc6 20.Qb2 Rf7 21.Bd4 Nf4 22.Ne4 Nxh3+ 23.Kh2 Rxf3 24.gxf3 Nf4 25.Bxg7 Nh5 26.Nf6+ Nxf6 27.Qxf6
Bell's: White's play is admirable, and in strong contract, thus far, with Black's, who has given up the exchange without sufficient equivalent, and has not got his queen's rook into battle yet.
27...Qxf6 28.Bxf6 Rf8 29.Rd8 Bxf2 30.Rxf8+ Kxf8 31.Re7 Bd4
Bell's: Beautifully imagined. Black seems to play better for having to work up hill.
CPC: Well played.
32.Bg5 h6 33.Re4 Bg7 34.Bd8 Nc6 35.Bxc7 Kf7 36.Kg3 g5 37.a4 h5 38.a5 Kf6 39.Rc4 Ke6 40.Rc5 Bf6 41.Rb5 b6
CPC: 41...Kd7 would have prevented White gaining the pawn, without more than an equivalent loss.
42.axb6 axb6 43.Kg2 Ne5 44.Bxb6 Kf5 45.Be3 Be7 46.Kf2 Bf6 47.Bd2 Be7 48.Ke3 Bf6
Bell's: The second player does not, of course, want to change the position, his motive being to draw the game. We think he might have succeeded if he had not grown impatient, and altered the situation. The h-pawn should not have been advanced at the coming move.
49.Be1 h4 50.Bc3 Bg7 51.Kf2 Bf6 52.Kg2 Bg7 53.Bd4 Bf6 54.Kh3 Kf4 55.Kg2 Kf5 56.Bg1 Kg6 57.Bh2 Nd3 58.Rd5 Nf4+
Bell's: All this we like not. It breaks the pawns, and White will win by placing king on g4, winning a pawn immediately.
59.Bxf4 gxf4 1-0
Bell's: From this point the game became uninteresting, and we did not take it down, seeing that it was won for White by its nature. Black, however, maintained it many moves before compelled to surrender. The second player's pawns appeared stronger in this game than they really were, because they were not supported by the king nor other pieces. Still, we conceive it ought to have been drawn twenty times over; but "oughts" go for little in chess.
CPC: In Greenwood Walker's edition, the game is dismissed at this point, with the brief intimation, "Mr. M'Donnell wins." There is no doubt, however, that in this instance, as in many others, the worthy compiler was at fault, and that the game was won by M. De la Bourdonnais.
Studies: 60.Kh3 and then 61.Kg4 winning.

This Game was played even.

Won by the late Mr. M'Donnell, the first English player, of M. C. L. de la Bourdonnais, the first player in France, if not in Europe.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.10 (83)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 Bb6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 d6 9.h3 Nf6 10.e5 dxe5 11.Ba3
CPC: This is a perilous mode of continuing the attack, and, if properly answered, gives the opening player a very bad game.
11...Bxd4
CPC: Instead of so playing, White should have moved 11...Be6, and then he would have had a decided superiority of position.
Studies: 11...Be6 wins.
12.Qb3
Bell's: Threatening to mate in two moves.
CPC: Threatening checkmate in two moves.
12...Qd7 13.Ng5 Nd8 14.Nc3 c5
CPC: It has been remarked, and we think truly, that in the last match between these celebrated belligerents, M. De la Bourdonnais's play exhibits a palpable deficiency in those brilliant characteristics which have rendered him so distinguished. This is strikingly manifest in the present game, the termination of which is a series of suicidal moves that would be thought discreditable to a player of the very humblest pretensions.
15.Nxf7
Bell's: Then, if he take 15...Nxf7, you move 16.Bb5.
15...Rf8 16.Nxe5 Bxe5 17.Rfe1 Nc6 18.Bxc5 Qf5 19.Nb5 Bd7 20.Nd6+ 1-0
Bell's: And wins queen. This last event was not necessary to force a conquest which had been certain for some time. White plays throughout in a style of highest excellence. Nothing can be finer.

Games Played By First-Rate Players In The Westminster Club.

This is one of the games won by Mr. M—, the first player in England, of Labourdonnais, and is sternly contested on both sides.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.11 (84)
White: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Nc3 Nf6 10.Bg5 h6 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.e5 dxe5 13.Nxe5 Nxe5 14.dxe5 Qh4 15.Qe2
CPC: Instead of this feeble move, it appears to us that White should have checked 15.Qa4+, and thus have compelled his adversary to move his king or lose the queen.
0-0 16.Kh1 Bg4 17.f3
CPC: 17.Qe4 would, perhaps, have been stronger play.
17...Bh5 18.Rad1 Rfe8 19.g4 Bg6 20.f4 c6 21.f5 Bh7 22.Rd7 Re7 23.Rxe7 Qxe7 24.e6
CPC: By advancing 24.f6, White would have obtained a fine attacking position; ex. gr. 24.f6 gxf6 (apparently his best move) 25.Ne4 (this is unquestionably better than taking 25.Rxf6 at once, because Black would then baffle all attack by 25...Rf8), Black has now several ways of playing; but none, we believe, which does not leave him an embarrassed game.
24...fxe6 25.Bxe6+ Kh8 26.Rd1 Rf8 27.Rd7 Qc5 28.Qe1 Ba5 29.Ne4 Qxf5
Bell's: Having an attack on the adverse queen, this is well played.
30.gxf5 Bxe1 31.Nd6 Bg8 32.Rxb7 Bf2 33.Nf7+ Bxf7 34.Bxf7 Bb6 35.Kg2 Kh7 36.Kf3 h5 37.Bg6+ Kh6 38.Re7 Rd8 39.Re6 Kg5 40.Re7 Bd4 41.Re4 Bf6 42.Rc4 Rc8 43.h4+ Kh6 44.a4 c5 45.Bf7 Bd4 46.Kf4 Rb8
Bell's: Black is looking mischievous.
47.Rc2 Rb4 48.Rc4 Bf2
Bell's: Highly Philidorian.
49.Ke5 Bxh4
Bell's: First player would have more chance of drawing, were the rooks taken off.
50.Rxc5 Bf6+ 51.Ke6 Rxa4 52.Rc8
Bell's: Intending to check at h8, and then capture h-pawn, but is frustrated by Black's moving on the pawn.
52...h4 53.Be8 Re4+ 54.Kf7 Kg5 55.Rc5 Re2 56.Rc7 a5 57.Bd7 h3 58.Be6 h2 59.Rc1 Kg4 60.Bc8 Kg3 61.Kg6 a4 62.Bb7 Re3 63.Rc2 a3 64.Rg2+ Kh3 65.Rd2 Bb2 66.Kh5 a2
Bell's: The first player here resigns the game. Black has played soundly and cautiously throughout.
67.f6 gxf6 0-1

This game is not printed in Greenwood Walker, but does appear in Lewis.

The following capital Game, played between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell, will be new to many of our readers, as we believe it is not to be found in Mr. Greenwood Walker's collection of their Games.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Sixth Match
Round: 6.12 (85)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mah,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 e6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.c3 d5 5.e5 f5 6.Bd3 Be7 7.Bc2 Qb6 8.0-0 Nh6 9.Kh1 0-0 10.d4 Bd7 11.a3 a5 12.h3 Be8 13.b3 cxd4 14.cxd4 Bh5 15.Be3 Rac8 16.Ra2 Kh8 17.Qd2 Qc7 18.Nh2 Bh4 19.Rg1 Bg3 20.Nf1 Bh4 21.Qd3 Bg6 22.Nbd2 Be7 23.Qe2 Qd7 24.g4 Qe8 25.g5 Ng8 26.Bd1 Bd8 27.h4 Bf7 28.h5 g6 29.hxg6 Bxg6 30.Qh2 Bb6 31.Nf3 Qf7 32.Ng3 Nge7 33.Rd2 Kg8 34.Nh4 Nxe5 35.fxe5 f4 36.Nxg6 Nxg6 37.Nh5 fxe3 38.Nf6+ Kh8 39.Rd3 Rg8 40.Rg3 Nf4 41.Rdxe3 Rg7 42.Ref3 Rc1 43.Qd2 Rxd1+ 44.Qxd1 Nh5 45.Rh3 Nxf6 46.Rxf6 Qe8 47.Qf1 Kg8 48.Qf4 Bd8 49.Qh4 Bxf6 50.exf6 Rc7 51.g6 Rc1+ 52.Kh2 Rc2+ 53.Kg1 Rc1+ 54.Kf2 Qxg6 55.Rg3 Rc2+ 56.Ke1 Kf7 57.Rxg6 Kxg6 58.f7 Rc8 59.Qe7 1-0
CPC: This game is remarkably well contested.

[Archive] [Excavations] [Gallery] [Journal] [Library] [Links] [Legend] [Market]
© 1999-2021 Jacques N. Pope. All Rights Reserved.