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Fourth Match, 1834 La Bourdonnais-McDonnell Matches
Researched by Nick Pope

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Chess Studies: 474849505152535455565758596061626364 
Match Game:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 101112131415161718Total
 Bourdonnais1000101001000101118
 McDonnell0001000100010000003
 Drawn 11  1  1 1 1 1   7

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.1 (47)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C23] Bishop's Opening
1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Bc5 3.c3 Qe7 4.Nf3 d6 5.0-0 Bb6 6.d4 Nf6 7.Na3
CPC: 7.Bf5 would we believe have been a better move.
7...Bg4 8.Nc2 Nbd7
CPC: If he had ventured to take 8...Nxe4, White would have obtained a decisive advantage by playing 9.Bd5.
9.Qd3
CPC: An injudicious move, and the primary source of White's subsequent difficulties.
9...d5 10.exd5 e4 11.Qd2 exf3 12.Re1 Ne4 13.Qf4 f5 14.gxf3 g5 15.Qe3 Ne5
CPC: This portion of the game is finely played by both parties.
16.Bb5+ c6 17.fxg4 Nxg4 18.Qe2 cxb5 19.f3 Ngf6 20.fxe4 Nxe4 21.Qxb5+ Qd7 22.Qxd7+ Kxd7 23.c4 Rae8 24.c5 Bd8 25.d6 f4 26.b4 Rhf8 27.Rf1 h5 28.Na3 Bf6 29.Bb2 g4
CPC: 29...a5 would also have been good play.
30.Nc4 f3 31.Ne5+ Bxe5 32.dxe5 h4 33.Rad1 f2+ 34.Kh1 h3 35.Rd3 Rg8 36.b5 g3 37.hxg3 Rxg3 38.Rd4 Reg8
Lewis: This is a bad move, instead of it he ought to take 38...Rxe5.
Studies: 38...Rxe5 (38...Rg1+ 39.Rxg1 Ng3+ 40.Kh2 fxg1Q+ 41.Kxg1 Ne2+ 42.Kh2 Nxd4 43.Bxd4 Rf8 44.Kxh3 Rf4 45.c6+ bxc6 46.bxc6+ Kxc6 47.Bxa7 draws) 39.c6+ bxc6 40.bxc6+ Kxc6 41.Rc4+ wins.
39.e6+ Kd8 40.Rdd1
Lewis: White would win the game if he were to take 40.Rxe4.
Studies: 40.Rxe4 wins.
40...h2 41.e7+ Kd7 42.c6+ bxc6 43.bxc6+ Kxc6 44.e8Q+ Rxe8 45.Kxh2 Re6 46.Rc1+ Kb5 47.a4+ Kb4 48.Bc3+ Rxc3 49.Rxc3 Kxc3 50.d7 Rd6 51.Kg2 Rxd7 52.Rc1+ Kd3 53.Kf1 Ke3 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.2 (48)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Bd6 7.Nf3 0-0 8.h3 Nc6 9.0-0 h6 10.Qd3 Na5 11.Bb5 a6 12.Ba4 c5 13.Bc2
CPC: The young player, upon examining the position, will perceive that White would have lost his queen, if he had ventured to take 13.dxc5.
13...c4 14.Qe2 b5 15.Ne4 Bb7 16.Bd2 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 Re8 18.Ne5 Bxe5 19.dxe5 Bxe4 20.Bxa5 Qd5
Lewis: 20...Bd3 would win a pawn at the least.
Palamède: S'ils avaient porté leur F à la 6 c. de sa D, ils auraient gagné au moins un pion. {If 20...Bd3, he would have won a pawn at least.}
Studies: 20...Bd3 wins.
21.f4 Re6
CPC: At first sight it appears that Black might here gave gained "the exchange," by moving 21...Bd3: in that case, however, his opponent, by playing 22.Qd2, and if Black afterwards checked with 22...Qc5+, interposing 23.Rf2, would have avoided any loss.
22.Rad1 Qc6 23.Rf2 Rae8 24.Bc3 f5 25.Kh2 Kh7 26.g4 g6 27.Qe3 Bd3 28.Rg2 Be4 29.Rg3 Qc7 30.Rd4 Rf8 31.Rd6 Rfe8
CPC: If Black had exchanged 31...Rxd6 32.exd6, and taken 32...Qxd6, he would have been mated in a very few moves.
32.Qd4 R8e7 33.h4 Bd3 34.h5 fxg4 35.hxg6+ Bxg6 36.Rxg4 Bf5 37.Rg2 Qb7 38.Rxe6 Rxe6 39.Rd2 Qf7 40.Kg1 Rg6+ 41.Rg2 Bh3
CPC: A good move.
42.Rxg6 Qxg6+ 43.Kf2 Qg2+ 44.Ke1 Qh1+ 45.Kd2 Bg4 46.Kc2 Qg2+ 47.Bd2 a5 48.a3 Bf5+ 49.Kc3 Qf3+ 50.Qe3 Qd5 51.Qa7+ Kg6 52.Qg1+ Kf7 53.Qa7+ Bd7 54.Kc2 Qd3+ 55.Kc1 a4 56.Be1 Qf5 57.Qf2 Qg4 58.Kd2 h5 59.Ke3 Kg6 60.Qc2+ Bf5 61.Qe2 Qg1+ 62.Qf2 Qxf2+ 63.Kxf2 h4 64.Kf3 Kh5 65.Bd2 Be6 66.Kg2 Kg4 67.Bc1 h3+ 68.Kh2 Kf3 69.Bd2 Ke2 70.Bc3 Kd3 71.Kg3 Kc2 72.Kh2 Kb3 73.Kg3 b4
Lewis: This advance of b-pawn is premature; Black ought to play 73...Bd7; if White play 74.Kh2, Black plays 74...Bc8, compelling White to play 75.Bd4, or 75.Kg3, then, by the advance of b-pawn, etc. Black would win: 73...Bd7 74.Kh2 Bc8 75.Kg3 b4 76.axb4 a3 77.bxa3 Kxc3 78.b5 Kd2 79.b6 c3 80.e6 c2 81.e7 c1Q 82.e8Q Qg1+ 83.Kf3 (or 83.Kh4 Qg4#) 83...Qg2#.
Palamède: Si les noirs, avant de pousser le P, jouaient leur F à la 2 c. de la D, ils auraient gagné la partie, comme l'on peut voir, par les coups suivants: 73...Bd7 74.Kh2 Bc8 75.Kg3 b4 76.axb4 a3 77.bxa3 Kxc3 78.b5 Kd2 79.b6 c3 80.e6 c2 81.e7 c1Q 82.e8Q Qg1+ 83.Kf3 (or 83.Kh4), La D fait échec et mat. {If Black, before pushing the pawn, played 73...Bd7, he would have won the game, as you can see by the following moves: 73...Bd7 74.Kh2 Bc8 75.Kg3 b4 76.axb4 a3 77.bxa3 Kxc3 78.b5 Kd2 79.b6 c3 80.e6 c2 81.e7 c1Q 82.e8Q Qg1+ 83.Kf3 (or 83.Kh4), and queen mates.}
Studies: 73...Bd7 wins.
74.axb4 a3
CPC: This part of the game is finely played by Mr. M'Donnell.
75.bxa3 Kxc3 76.b5 Kd2 77.b6 Bd5
Lewis: It would have been better to have played 77...Bc8, though perhaps even then the game would be drawn, it would however be much more difficult for White. Black being now obliged to play the bishop, prevents his winning the game; if he had played as recommended in the above note, he would easily win.
Studies: 77...Bc8.
78.e6 c3 79.e7 c2 80.e8Q c1Q 81.Kxh3 Qh1+ 82.Kg4 Bf3+ 83.Kf5 Qb1+ 84.Kg5 Qg1+ 85.Kf6 Qxb6+
Lomonosov: Draw.
86.Qe6 Qd8+ 87.Kg6 Bd5 88.Qf6 Qg8+ 89.Kh6 Ke3 90.a4 Be4 91.a5 Qh7+ 92.Kg5 Qg8+ 93.Kh6 ½-½

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.3 (49)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C23] Bishop's Opening
1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Bc5 3.Nf3 d6
CPC: Having played 2...Bc5, the second player can safely and effectually protect his e-pawn thus.
4.c3 Qe7 5.0-0 Nf6 6.d4 Bb6 7.Bg5 c6 8.Nbd2 h6 9.Bh4 g5 10.Bg3 Bc7 11.Bb3 Bg4 12.Qe1 Nbd7 13.Qe3 Nh7 14.h3 Bxf3 15.Qxf3 Nhf8 16.Nc4 h5 17.Ne3 f6 18.Nf5 Qh7 19.h4 Ng6 20.Rfd1 0-0-0 21.a4 Nf4 22.a5 d5 23.Bc2
CPC: A threatening move.
23...Qf7 24.Bxf4 g4 25.Qe2 exf4 26.a6 b6 27.exd5 Rhe8
CPC: If he had taken 27...cxd5, White would have gained "the exchange" at least.
28.Qc4 Qxd5 29.Qxd5 cxd5 30.Re1 Kb8 31.Ne7
CPC: This is apparently a good move; but we believe, that by 31.Bh4, he would have got a better game.
31...Ne5 32.dxe5 Rxe7 33.exf6 Rf7 34.Re6 Rd6 35.Rae1 Rxe6 36.Rxe6 Bd8 37.Bg6
CPC: We should have preferred 37.Rd6.
37...Rxf6 38.Rxf6 Bxf6 39.g3 fxg3 40.fxg3 d4 41.c4 Kc7 42.Bxh5 d3 43.b3 Kd6 44.Bxg4 Kc5 45.Bd1 Kb4 46.Kf2 Kc3 47.Ke3 Bd4+ 48.Ke4 Bf2 49.Kf4
Lewis: I am inclined to think, that if instead of this move he had played 49.h5 he might have won the game.
Studies: 49.h5 draws.
49...Kd2 50.Bf3 Kc3 51.Bd1 Kd2 52.Bg4 Kc3 53.Kf3 Bd4 54.Bf5 d2 55.Ke2 Bf2 56.h5 Bxg3 57.Kd1 Bf4 58.Be6 Bh6 59.Bf5 Bg5 ½-½

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.4 (50)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e4 e5 4.d5 f5 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Bxc4 Bc5
CPC: We believe that Black should have taken 6...fxe4; in which case, the annexed moves would probably have followed:— 6...fxe4 7.Nxe4 Nxe4 8.Qh5+ g6 9.Qxe5+ Qe7 10.Qxh8 Qb4+ and Black ought certainly to win. Observe that his last move is much better than discovering check by playing the knight; for, if 11.Ke2, or to 11.Kf1, Black may take 11...Qxc4+; and if he play 11.Kd1 Nxf2+, and afterwards gain the rook.
Studies: 6...fxe4 wins.
7.Nf3 Qe7 8.Bg5
CPC: Injudiciously played: he should have moved 8.Qe2.
8...Bxf2+ 9.Kf1 Bb6 10.Qe2 f4 11.Rd1 Bg4 12.d6 cxd6 13.Nd5
13...Nxd5
CPC: An ingenious and enterprising stroke of play.
14.Bxe7
CPC: We are disposed to think White should have had an improved game, by taking 14.Bxd5; ex. gr. 14.Bxd5 Bxf3 (apparently his best move) 15.gxf3 Qxg5 16.Bxb7 and gains at least "the exchange."
14...Ne3+ 15.Ke1 Kxe7 16.Qd3 Rd8 17.Rd2 Nc6 18.b3 Ba5 19.a3 Rac8 20.Rg1 b5 21.Bxb5 Bxf3 22.gxf3 Nd4 23.Bc4 Nxf3+ 24.Kf2 Nxd2 25.Rxg7+ Kf6 26.Re7 Kg6 27.Rb7 Ndxc4 28.bxc4 Rxc4 29.Qb1
CPC: With the view to check 30.Qg1+.
29...Bb6 30.Kf3
CPC: If White had given the threatened check 30.Qg1+, he would have lost his queen.
30...Rc3 31.Qa2 Nc4+ 32.Kg4 Rg8 33.Rxb6
CPC: The only move to prevent immediate checkmate.
33...axb6 34.Kh4 Kf6 35.Qe2 Rg6 36.Qh5 Ne3 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.5 (51)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Be7
CPC: Retiring the bishop at this point, either to f8 or to e7, is a very objectionable mode of play.
6.d4
CPC: 6.Qb3, before advancing the d-pawn, would have been better play.
6...d6 7.Qb3 Na5 8.Qa4+
Lewis: I think it would be better to take 8.Bxf7+.
CPC: White might have gained a palpable advantage by taking 8.Bxf7+, and then moving 9.Qa3 or 9.Qa4.
Studies: 8.Bxf7+.
8...c6 9.Bd3 b5 10.Qc2 Bf6 11.dxe5 dxe5 12.0-0
CPC: 12.a4 would have been a good move.
12...Ne7 13.Ba3 0-0 14.Nbd2 Be6 15.Rad1 Qc7 16.Nb3 Nc4 17.Bc1
CPC: We should have preferred playing 17.Bc5.
17...Rfd8 18.h3 c5 19.Nh2 Ng6 20.Ng4 Nd6 21.Be2 Be7 22.f4 exf4
CPC: 22...Bxg4 with the view to advance 23.c4, would have improved Black's game.
23.Bxf4 Nxf4 24.Rxf4 Nc4 25.Rf3 Bxg4 26.hxg4 Ne5 27.Rh3 Rxd1+ 28.Qxd1 Rd8 29.Qf1 c4 30.Nd4 Bc5 31.Qf5 g6 32.Qf2 Qe7 33.Kh1 b4 34.Qe3 bxc3 35.Qh6 f6 36.Ne6 Qxe6 37.Qxh7+ Kf8 38.Qc7 Be7 39.Rxc3 Qb6 40.Qxb6 axb6 41.a4 Bb4 42.Rc2 c3 43.Kh2 Rd2 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.6 (52)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bd6
CPC: This move is not to be commended; it seriously impedes the march of the defending player's pieces.
6.d4 h6 7.0-0 g5 8.Nxe5 Bxe5 9.dxe5 Nxe5 10.Bb3 g4
CPC: Preventing the threatened advance of the f-pawn.
11.Bf4 Ng6 12.Qxg4 d6 13.Qf3 Qf6 14.Bg3 Qxf3 15.gxf3 f5 16.f4 fxe4 17.Nd2 Nf6 18.Nxe4 Nxe4 19.Rfe1 Bg4
CPC: If he had played 19...Bf5, in the vain attempt to sustain his knight, White would have moved 20.f3, and have been enabled to station two pawns in the center.
20.Rxe4+ Kd7 21.Rae1 Raf8 22.Rb4 b6 23.Ba4+ c6 24.f5
CPC: He judiciously sacrificed this pawn, to capture a more important one from the enemy.
24...Bxf5 25.Rd4 Rf6 26.Red1 b5 27.Rxd6+ Rxd6 28.Rxd6+ Ke7 29.Bb3 Rc8 30.h4 Nxh4 31.Rxh6 Nf3+ 32.Kg2 Ne1+ 33.Kf1 Nd3 34.Bc2 c5 35.Rh5 Be4 36.f3
Lewis: Instead of this move he should have played 36.Kg1.
36...Rf8
CPC: The terminating moves are played with great skill and caution.
37.Bxd3 Rxf3+ 38.Bf2 Bxd3+ 39.Kg2 Rf5 40.Bxc5+ Kf7 41.Rxf5+ Bxf5 ½-½

Games Played By First-Rate Players In The Westminster Club.

Chess.—The three games in our Paper of the 25th of Jan. were played by La Bourdonnais against Mr. M., the former playing the White.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.7 (53)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bd6
Bell's: A most objectionable defence; evidently had from the manner in which the position of the bishop cramps the pieces behind it.
Palamède: Mauvais coup de défense, il empèche le dégagement du P de la D et du F de la D. {Bad defensive move, he prevents the release of the d-pawn and bishop-c8.}
6.0-0 h6 7.d4 Nf6 8.dxe5
Bell's: We should prefer taking 8.Nxe5.
8...Bxe5 9.Nxe5 Nxe5 10.Bb3 Qe7
CPC: Had he taken the e-pawn, White might have won a piece.
11.f4 Qc5+ 12.Kh1 Neg4 13.Qe2
Bell's: To prevent 13...Nf2+.
CPC: 13.e5 would have been a good move.
13...Qh5 14.h3 0-0 15.e5 Re8 16.Qf3 Qh4
Bell's: Play as he may, he has clearly lost one of the knights.
17.exf6 d6 18.Na3 Re1 19.Bd2 Nf2+ 20.Kh2 Bxh3
Palamède: Le noirs ayant mauvais jeu sacrifient plusieurs pièces pour une attaque désespéree. {Black having a bad game sacrifices several pieces for a desperate attack.}
21.Qxf2 Qxf2 22.Rxf2 Rxa1 23.gxh3 g6 24.Rg2 Kf8 25.f5 g5 26.h4 1-0
Bell's: The second player very properly here resigned the game, which he has no chance of saving.
CPC: The defence in this game reflects little credit upon the talent or discretion of the second player; it is poorly conducted from beginning to end.

Games Actually Played In The Westminster Club

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.8 (54)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C37] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 g4 5.Nc3
Bell's: A new mode of playing the Muzio Gambit, and giving a tremendous attack if not properly answered.
Palamède: Variante fort jolie et qui demande souvent, pour conserver l'attaque, le sacrifice d'une autre piecè. Elle est de l'invention de M. Macdonnell, elle était entièrement inconnue à son adversaire. {A very pretty variant to keep up the attack. It is the invention of Mr. Macdonnell, and was entirely unknown to his opponent.}
CPC: We prefer this move, or playing 5.d4, to 5.0-0.
5...gxf3
Palamède: La prise de ce cavalier constitue le gambit Muzio. {Taking this knight constitutes the Muzio gambit.}
6.Qxf3
CPC: 6.0-0 would also have been good play.
6...Bh6
Palamède: Mauvais coup de défense. {Bad move for defense.}
CPC: 6...d5 is considered a better move at this point.
7.d4 Nc6 8.0-0 Nxd4 9.Bxf7+
Palamède: Second sacrifice nécessaire pour conserver l'attaque. {Second sacrifice is necessary to preserve the attack.}
CPC: Finely played.
9...Kxf7 10.Qh5+ Kg7 11.Bxf4 Bxf4 12.Rxf4 Nf6 13.Qg5+ Kf7 14.Raf1
Bell's: This is better play than 14.Rxf6+ Qxf6 15.Rf1.
14...Ke8 15.Rxf6 Qe7 16.Nd5 Qc5 17.Kh1
Palamède: Les noirs abandonnent la partie, qui dans cette position est forcément perdue. {Black abandoned the game, which from this position is forcibly lost.}
17...Ne6 18.Rxe6+ dxe6
Studies: Mate in four.
19.Nf6+ 1-0
Bell's: And wins queen, and consequently game. The first player has played this game in great style. By different play during the latter moves Black might have prolonged the game, for he need not have lost his queen; but it is very doubtful whether any play could have retrieved it for a long time back.
CPC: The defence in this game is but indifferently played.

Lewis gives the game as White (Bourdonnais) vs Black (McDonnell), whereas Greenwood gives this game as McDonnell-Bourdonnais. The Chess Player's Chronicle and Chess Studies follow Lewis. La Bourdonnais gives the game as White (Bourdonnais) vs Black (McDonnell) which should settle all doubt.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.9 (55)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C38] King's Gambit Accepted
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 Bg7 5.d4 d6 6.h4 h6 7.c3 Nc6 8.hxg5 hxg5 9.Rxh8 Bxh8 10.Qe2 Qe7 11.Na3 Bg4 12.Bd2 0-0-0 13.0-0-0 Nf6 14.Bd3 Re8 15.Re1 Nh5 16.Qf2 Bxf3 17.gxf3 a6 18.Bc2 Ng3 19.Ba4 Bg7
Palamède '37: Les noirs font ici une faute; en perdant un échange, il fallait retirer la T. {Black here makes an error; losing the exchange, he had to move the rook.}
CPC: 19...b5 would have been a better move.
20.d5 Nb8
CPC: If he had played 20...Ne5, White by moving 21.Qa7, would have had a winning position.
21.Bxe8 Qxe8 22.Qg2 Qh8 23.Rd1 f5 24.Be1 Be5 25.exf5 Qh7 26.Nc4 Qxf5 27.Nxe5 Qxe5 28.Bxg3 fxg3 29.Rg1 Qxd5 30.Qxg3 b6 31.Qg4+ Nd7
CPC: Had he moved 31...Kb7, White might have compelled an exchange of queens.
32.Rd1
CPC: 32.Re1 would perhaps have been still stronger.
32...Qe5 33.Rg1 Qe3+ 34.Kb1 c6 35.Rh1 Kc7 36.a3 b5 37.Ka2 Qe8 38.Qf5 Qe2 39.Qxg5 Qxf3 40.Rh6 Qe4 41.Qg8 Qe2 42.Rh8 Kb6 43.Rh7
Palamède '37: Si les blancs gagnaient la pièce, les noirs remettraient la partie. {If White wins the piece, Black draws the game.}
43...Kc7 44.Qf7 Kb6 45.Rg7
CPC: White dared not take 45.Qxd7, from apprehension of "perpetual check."
45...Qe4 46.Qf2+ Nc5 47.Rg1
CPC: To have advanced 47.b5 would have been very injudicious.
47...Qc4+ 48.Ka1 a5 49.Rd1 Kc7 50.Qf6 Nb7
CPC: This part of the game is played with consummate skill by both parties.
51.Rg1 c5 52.Rg7+ Kb6 53.Qf7
CPC: We should have preferred 54.Qf3.
53...Qe4 54.Ka2 a4 55.Rg8 Qc6 56.Qe6 Qf3 57.Rc8 Qh1 58.Qf7 Ka7 59.c4
CPC: An ill considered move.
59...Qh3 60.Rc7 Qb3+ 61.Kb1 bxc4 62.Qd5 Qb6 63.Qc6 Qxc6 64.Rxc6 d5 65.Kc2 d4 66.Kd1
CPC: This move enforces Black to give up a pawn.
66...Kb8 67.Ra6 Kc7 68.Rxa4 Nd6 69.Ra6 Ne4 70.Kc2 Nd6 71.a4 Nc8 72.a5 Kb7 73.Rf6 Na7 74.b3
Lewis: It would probably be better to advance 74.b4, compelling Black to take it with one of his pawns, which would prevent his advancing the pawn to b6 without loss.
Palamède '37: Les blancs auraient dû pousser ce P 2 c., et forcer par là les noirs à prendre avec un de leurs P. {White had to push 74.b4, and thereby force Black to recapture with one of his pawns.
74...c3 75.b4 cxb4 76.Rb6+ Kc7 77.Rxb4
Lomonosov: White mates in 40.
77...Nc6 78.Rb5 Na7 79.Rb1 Kc6 80.a6 Nc8 81.Kd3
Lewis: Instead of this move, White should play 81.Rb7; if Black move the king, White advance the pawn; if he move 81...Nb6 or 81...Nd6, White also wins by playing 82.Rb8.
Palamède '37: A la place de ce coup, si les blancs avaient joué la T à la 7 c. du C de la D, ils auraient gagné; car si les noirs jouent le R, ils avancent le P; s'ils jouent le C à al 3 c. C de la D ou à la 3 c. de la D, l'on gagne en jouant la T à la c. du C de la D adverse. {Instead of this move, if White played 81.Rb7 he would have won; because if Black moves the king, he advances the pawn; if he plays 81...Nb6 or 81...Nd6, he wins by playing 82.Rb8.
Studies: 81.Rb7 wins.
81...Kc7 82.Kxd4 c2 83.Rc1 Kb6 84.Rxc2 Na7 85.Ra2 Nb5+ 86.Kc4 Na7 87.Ra1 Nc6 88.Ra3 Na7 89.Kd5
Lewis: I am inclined to think, that if White had placed his rook on h1 previous to moving the king, he might have won the game, either by playing his king to a8, or, should Black prevent that, by playing the king so that when Black takes the pawn, White may have a winning position. The following moves will serve as an example; instead of playing 89.Kd5, he plays—89.Ra2 Nc6 90.Ra1 Na7 91.Kd5 Nb5 92.Ke5:
A) 92...Na7 93.Kd6 Nc8+ 94.Kd7 Na7 95.Kd8 Nc6+ (if Black now play 95...Kc6, White would win by playing 96.Rb1) 96.Kc8 Ka7 97.Kc7 Nb8 98.Ra4 Nxa6+ 99.Kc6, and wins.
B) 92...Nc7 93.a7 Kb7 94.Kf6 Ka8 95.Ke7 Nb5 96.Kd7 Nxa7 97.Rb1, and wins.
C) 92...Ka7 93.Ke6 Nc7+ 94.Kd6 Nxa6 95.Kc6, and wins.
Palamède '37: Les blancs auraient encore dû gagner. Voyez la variante: {White still could have won. Viz.:}
89.Ra2 Nc6 90.Ra1 Na7 91.Kd5 Nb5 92.Ke5:
A) 92...Na7 93.Kd6 Nc8+ 94.Kd7 Na7 95.Kd8 Nc6+ 96.Kc8 Ka7 97.Kc7 Nb8 98.Ra4 Nxa6+ 99.Kc6 wins.
B) 92...Nc7 93.a7 Kb7 94.Kf6 Ka8 95.Ke7 Nb5 96.Kd7 Nxa7 97.Rb1, and wins the game.
C) 92...Ka7 93.Ke6 Nc7+ 94.Kd6 Nxa6 95.Kc6, and wins.
Studies: 89.Ra2 (wins) 89...Nc6 90.Ra1 Na7 91.Kd5 Nb5 92.Ke5 Na7 (92...Nc7 93.a7 Kb7 94.Kf6 Ka8 95.Ke7 Nb5 96.Kd7 Nxa7 97.Rb1 wins) 93.Kd6 Nc8+ 94.Kd7 Na7 95.Kd8 Nc6+ 96.Kc8 Ka7 97.Kc7 Nb8 98.Ra4 Nxa6+ 99.Kc6 (wins).
89...Nb5 90.Rb3 Kxa6 91.Kc5 Na7 92.Rb8 Ka5 ½-½

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.10 (56)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.Bb2 Nf6 10.d5 Na5
Palamède: Mauvais coup; à la 2 c. du R ètait préferable. {Bad move; 10...Nce7 is better.}
11.Bd3
CPC: 11.e5 would also have been a good move.
11...0-0 12.h3 Nh5 13.Qd2 f5 14.Nc3 f4 15.Rfe1 a6 16.e5
Palamède: Coup décisif d'attaque. {Decisive move of the attack.}
16...Bf5 17.e6 Qe7 18.Na4 Bxd3 19.Qxd3 Ba7 20.Bc3 b6 21.Nd4 Qg5 22.Nf3
Lewis: 22.e7, and then 23.Ne6, would have been better.
22...Qf5 23.Qxf5 Rxf5 24.Bxa5 bxa5 25.Rac1 Rc8 26.Rc6 Rxd5 27.Rec1 Ng3
CPC: Well played.
28.Re1
CPC: If White had taken 28.Rxc7, and then exchanged rooks, he would have been mated in three moves.
28...Nf5 29.e7 Re8 30.Rxc7 Bd4 31.Ng5 h6
32.Rc8 hxg5 33.Rxe8+ Kh7 34.Rh8+ Kxh8 35.e8Q+ Kh7 36.Qf7 Rb5 37.Re6 1-0

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.11 (57)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B32] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4
CPC: This is not a good move.
3...cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5 5.Nxc6 bxc6 6.Bc4 Nf6 7.Bg5 Bc5 8.0-0 h6 9.Bxf6 Qxf6 10.Nc3 a5
CPC: To prevent his bishop being driven from the attack on the f-pawn, by White playing 11.Na4.
11.Kh1 d6 12.Qd2
Bell's: Preparatory to advancing 13.f4.
12...g5
Bell's: This frustrates your intention.
13.Rad1 Ke7
Bell's: Having advanced his pawns on both sides, castling would be very unsafe. He, therefore, properly prefers playing up the king, to allow of his rooks acting in conjunction.
14.Na4 Bd4
CPC: For the purpose of tempting his adversary to advance 15.c3, and thus shut the knight from play.
15.Qd3
Bell's: If you advance 15.c3, he retreats 15...Ba7, and your knight would then be posted badly.
15...h5
Bell's: To take 15...Bxf2 would cost him the bishop.
16.Qb3 h4 17.f3 h3 18.g3 Bd7 19.c3 Rab8 20.Qc2 Ba7 21.Qd2 Rhg8 22.b3 Rbd8 23.Nb2 Rg7 24.Be2 Qg6 25.Nc4 Bc5 26.Nxa5 Rb8 27.b4 Bb6 28.Nc4 Qf6 29.Nxd6 Rgg8 30.Nxf7 Be6
Bell's: "Le renard subtil" plays this well. White's last move was hasty.
31.Nd6 Rgd8 32.c4 Bxc4 33.Bxc4 Rxd6 34.Qxd6+ Qxd6 35.Rxd6 Kxd6 36.Rb1 Bd4 37.Bf1 Ra8 38.Bxh3 Rxa2 39.Bg2
Bell's: Strange as it may appear to the uninitiated, after this move Black will draw the game by compelling the exchange of rooks.
39...Rb2 40.Rxb2
Bell's: Unless you change rooks, you lose b-pawn, which would allow of his advancing c-pawn.
40...Bxb2 41.Bf1
Bell's: Were the bishops running on the same diagonals, you would win, because you could oppose your bishop to his at the proper moment, and the change would be ruin to him. As it is, the game is drawn, play what you will. You managed badly in allowing the rooks to be taken off.
41...Ke6 42.Kg2 Kf6 43.Kh3 Bc3 44.b5 cxb5 45.Bxb5
CPC: The game, according to Greenwood Walker, was drawn, from the above position; it appears to us that White ought to have won without much trouble.
45...Bd4 46.Kg4
Bell's: This is a most useful bit of elementary matter. Black guards the black squares, and you can never drive him from them.
46...Be3 47.h4 gxh4 48.Kxh4 Bc5 49.Kg4 Bf2 50.f4 Bd4 51.Kf3 Bc3 52.Kg4 Bd4 53.Kh5 Bf2 54.Kg4 Bd4 55.Bd3 Be3 56.Kf3 Bd2 ½-½
Bell's: After a little more useless marching and counter-marching, the game was quitted as being drawn. The black pieces were conducted by the famous La Bourdonnais, his opponent being Mr. M., the first player in England. La Bourdonnais seems to have played carelessly for some moves, but redeemed his fortune with high judgment. There is not that brilliancy about this game which marks so many of the games played by these gentlemen, but the latter part is interesting and instructive, and to players of the first and second class particularly so.

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.12 (58)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B32] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nxd4
CPC: 4...e5 would have been better play.
5.Qxd4 e6 6.Bc4 Ne7 7.Nc3 Nc6 8.Qd1 Bc5 9.0-0 0-0 10.Kh1 f5
CPC: It is generally good play to advance this pawn two squares, after the king has castled, for the purpose of bringing the h-rook into immediate action; in the present instance, however, by doing so White Black compromised his game.
11.exf5 Rxf5 12.Bd3 Rf8 13.Qh5
Bell's: By this move you evidently gain something, as you attack bishop, and, at the same time, offer to capture h-pawn. No doubt Black should have prevented this, as he might have done by different play.
13...Rf5
CPC: His only move to save a piece.
14.Bxf5 exf5 15.Qxf5 d6 16.Qd5+ Kh8 17.Bg5 Qf8 18.Ne4 Nb4 19.Qb3 Qf5 20.Rae1 Bd7
CPC: The defence throughout this game is very indifferently played.
21.a4 1-0
Bell's: White was the conqueror. He has so great a superiority, that we did not think it worth while to take down any more of the moves. In consequence of Black's blunder, this game is but a poor affair, though played by two first-rate players.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.13 (59)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5 Ne5
CPC: We prefer 9...Nce7 at this stage of the opening.
10.Nxe5 dxe5 11.Nd2
CPC: 11.Kh1, with the view to advance 12.f4, would also have been a good move.
11...Ne7 12.Nf3 Qd6 13.Bb5+
CPC: The attack from this point is carried on with remarkable vigour and ingenuity.
13...Bd7 14.Bxd7+ Kxd7 15.Qa4+ Kd8 16.Ba3 Qf6 17.d6 Nc6 18.Rad1 Nd4 19.Nxd4 Bxd4 20.Kh1 c5 21.Rxd4
CPC: Finely played.
21...cxd4 22.f4 exf4 23.Bc5 d3 24.Bb6+ axb6 25.Qxa8+ Kd7 26.Qxh8 f3 27.gxf3
Lewis: Instead of this move, he should take 27.Qxh7, winning easily.
CPC: If White, instead of this move, had taken 27.Qxh7, we believe he might have won the game with facility.
Studies: 27.Qxh7 wins.
27...d2 28.Qb8 Qxf3+ 29.Rxf3 d1Q+ 30.Kg2 Qd2+ 31.Rf2 Qg5+ 32.Kf3 Qf6+ 33.Ke2 Qb2+ 34.Kf1 Qc1+ 35.Ke2 Qb2+ 36.Kd3 Qa3+ 37.Ke2 Qb7+ 38.Kf3 Qf6+ 39.Kg4 Qg6+ ½-½

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.14 (60)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5 Ne5 10.Nxe5 dxe5 11.Nd2 Qf6 12.Nf3 Ne7 13.Bb2 Ng6 14.Kh1 0-0 15.Nxe5
Bell's: Beautifully played on the part of White.
15...Nxe5 16.f4 Nxc4 17.Bxf6 gxf6 18.Rf3
Bell's: White will have no manner of difficulty in finishing off his adversary. The queen is worth a whole shoal of minor fry. The fifteenth move of White, which, in fact, decides the game, will be duly appreciated by the discerning amateur.
18...Kh8 19.Qd3 Nd6 20.f5 Rg8 21.Rf4 Bd7 22.Qc3 Rg7 23.Qxf6 Rg8 24.Rh4 Be3 25.Qc3 Bg5 26.Rg4 f6 27.h4 h5 28.hxg5
CPC: Well played.
28...hxg4 29.g6 Nxe4 30.Qxc7 Re8 31.Rf1 g3 32.Qf4 Kg8 33.Kg1 Re5
CPC: 33...Nc3 would perhaps have been better play.
34.Qe3 b6 35.Qd4 Nd6 36.Qh4 Ne4 37.d6 a5 38.Rf4 Nc3 39.Rf1 Ne2+ 40.Kh1 Bxf5 41.Rxf5 Re8
Studies: 41...Rxf5 42.Qc4+ Kh8 43.Qc8+ Rg8 44.Qxf5 wins.
42.Qc4+ 1-0

Select Games Of Chess, By The First Players Of The Day.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.15 (61)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B32] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5 5.Nxc6 bxc6 6.Bc4 Nf6 7.Qe2 Be7 8.Nc3 0-0 9.Bg5 Nxe4 10.Bxe7 Nxc3 11.Qxe5
CPC: The attack and counter attack at this point are skilfully sustained.
11...Re8 12.0-0 Qxe7 13.Qxc3
Bell's: The moves which have been played up to this point constitute the first act of the drama. The situations have been particularly critical on both sides during this smart skirmish, and the play throughout has been nothing but first-rate.
13...d5 14.Bd3 Qd6 15.Rad1 Bd7 16.Qd4 c5 17.Qh4 g6 18.c3 Bc6 19.f4 c4 20.Bb1 Re2 21.Rf2 Rae8 22.f5 Qe5 23.Rdf1 Qe3 24.fxg6 fxg6 25.Qf6
Bell's: Evidently the best move.
25...Rxf2 26.Qxf2 Kg7
Bell's: These delicacies of play show the real artist. White cannot prevent the exchange of queens, and Black justly prefers leaving the position unchanged, in order to get his rook, should White take queen, into his enemies' camp.
27.Qxe3 Rxe3 28.Kf2
Bell's: By this move you prevent Black's establishing his rook in your quarters, and, compelling him to retreat, ensure a drawn game.
28...Re5 29.Re1 Rxe1 30.Kxe1 ½-½
Bell's: This game was abandoned as drawn. Between first-rate player no other termination could be expected from the present position. Of course, if the one player were giving odds to the other, he would not draw such a situation as the present without carrying it much further.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.16 (62)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B32] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5
Palamède: Les noirs n'auraient pas aussi bien joué en prenant le cavalier avec leur cavalier; toutes le fois que dans le début d'une partie vous pouvez pousser un pion attaquant une pièce, vous gagnez un temps. {Black would not do as well by taking 4...Nxd4; in the beginning of the game when you can push a pawn attacking piece, you gain time.}
5.Nxc6
CPC: This is not so good as retiring the knight.
5...bxc6 6.Bc4 Nf6 7.Bg5 Be7 8.Qe2 d5 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.Bb3 0-0 11.0-0 a5
Palamède: En poussant ce pion, les noirs menacent de forcer le fou ou de gagner l'échange d'un fou contre une tour. {In pushing this pawn, Black threatens to trap the bishop or gain the exchange of bishop for a rook.}
12.exd5 cxd5 13.Rd1 d4 14.c4
Palamède: Ce coup est mal joué de la part des blancs; ils suraient mieux fait de ne pousser qu'un pas leur pion, ils seraient alors parvenus à isoler le pion de la reine de leur adversaire, tandis qu'en poussant deux pas, ils établissent au centre deux pions formidables. {This is a bad move by White; it would have been better to push 14.c3 to isolate Black's d-pawn, while 14.c4 allows the establishment of two formidable center pawns.}
CPC: 14.c3 would have been better play.
14...Qb6 15.Bc2 Bb7
Palamède: Les noirs ne peuvent pas prendre le pion sans perdre leur reine. {Black cannot take 15...Qxb2 without losing the queen.}
CPC: It is pretty obvious that Black would have lost his queen if he had taken 15...Qxb2.
16.Nd2 Rae8 17.Ne4 Bd8 18.c5 Qc6 19.f3 Be7 20.Rac1
Palamède: Ce coup sauve le pion blanc doublement attaqué. {This move saves the doubly attacked pawn.}
20...f5 21.Qc4+ Kh8
Palamède: Les noirs, en jouant leur roi à la case de sa tour, consentent à perdre l'échange d'une tour contre un fou, pensant avec raison que si leur adversaire gagne momentanément ce petit avantage, ils pourront établir trois pions passés dans le centre, qui gagneront forcément la partie. {Black, playing 21...Kh8, agrees to lose the exchange of rook for bishop, rightly thinking that if his opponent momentarily wins this small advantage, he can establish three passed pawns in the center which will inevitably win the game.}
22.Ba4 Qh6
CPC: Black's play from this point to the end of the game is well deserving attention.
23.Bxe8 fxe4 24.c6 exf3 25.Rc2
Palamède: Coup de défense pour éviter le mat. {Defensive move to prevent mate.}
CPC: If White had ventured to take the bishop, he would have been mated by force in five or six moves.
25...Qe3+ 26.Kh1 Bc8 27.Bd7 f2 28.Rf1
Palamède: Coup forcé. {Forced move.}
28...d3 29.Rc3 Bxd7 30.cxd7 e4 31.Qc8 Bd8 32.Qc4
Lewis: It would be rather better to play 32.Rcc1.
Palamède: Au lieu de ce coup, il eût mieux valu jouer la tour de la reine à la case de son fou. {Instead of this move, it would have been better to play 32.Rcc1.}
Studies: 32.Rcc1.
32...Qe1 33.Rc1 d2 34.Qc5 Rg8 35.Rd1 e3 36.Qc3 Qxd1 37.Rxd1
Palamède: La position de ces trois pions du centre est très curieuse. {The position of these three center pawns is very curious.}
37...e2 0-1
Lewis: The position of the three center pawns is very curious.

Selection Of Games Played In The Westerminster Chess Club.—No. XL.

Between the same Players.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.17 (63)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C51] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0-0 d6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 Bb6 9.d5 Na5
Studies: Nce7.
10.Bd3 Nf6 11.Nc3 0-0 12.h3 Bd7 13.Bg5 h6 14.Bh4 g5 15.Nxg5
Bell's: Bravo, White! This is a fine opportunity of giving up a piece for the moment, with every chance of solid ultimate compensation.
15...hxg5 16.Bxg5 Bd4 17.Ne2
Bell's: Well done, once more, on our side.
17...Bxa1 18.Qxa1 Kg7 19.f4 Qe7 20.Qc3 b6 21.Rf3
Bell's: The game is won, as you, Mr. Black, cannot prevent our taking 22.Bxf6, and then checking with rook. It is so natural to side with the conqueror, not only in chess, but in most other matters.
21...Nc4 22.Bxf6+ Qxf6 23.Rg3+ 1-0

Games Played By First-Rate Players In The Westminster Club.—[...]
No. XIV.

This game is not remarkably interesting. It was won by La Bourdonnais of Mr. M., who plays throughout in a sort of "sleepy hollow" style, very unlike his usual vivacious manner. He appears to have wanted one of Swift's "flappers" at his ear.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Fourth Match
Round: 4.18 (64)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B30] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 e6 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.e5 d5 6.exf6 dxc4 7.fxg7 Bxg7 8.Ne4 Qd5 9.Ng3 h5 10.h4 e5 11.0-0 Bg4 12.Qe2 f5 13.Qe3 Bxf3 14.Qxf3 Qxf3 15.gxf3 Nd4
Bell's: Well calculated.
16.Kg2 Nxc2 17.Rb1 Nd4 18.b3 cxb3 19.axb3 0-0-0 20.d3 Bf6 21.f4 Rhg8 22.Kh3 exf4 23.Bxf4 Rg4 24.Bg5 Bxg5 25.hxg5 Ne6 26.Nxf5 Rxd3+ 27.Ne3 Rxg5 28.b4 Rd4 29.bxc5 Rxc5 30.Rbc1 Rxc1 31.Rxc1+ Kd7 32.Kg3
Bell's: But loses. This game is not remarkably interesting. It was won by La Bourdonnais of Mr. M., who plays throughout in a sort of "sleepy hollow" style, very unlike his usual vivacious manner. He appears to have wanted one of Swift's "flappers" at his ear.
0-1

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