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Second Match, 1834 La Bourdonnais-McDonnell Matches
Researched by Nick Pope

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Chess Studies: 262728293031323334 
Match Game:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 Total
 Bourdonnais0010011104
 McDonnell1101100015
 Drawn         0

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.1 (26)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C52] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4
CPC: Mr. M'Donnell was so conversant with the different methods of conducting the attack in this brilliant opening, and had practised them so repeatedly with success, that we are surprised to find no instance of "The Evans Gambit" having been played at an earlier stage of his contest with M. De la Bourdonnais.
Ledger: The game before us is the first in which that most beautiful of openings, the "Evans' Gambit," occurs between these two distinguished players. M'Donnell had for some time been familiar with the attack, having analyzed this debut with its originator, Captain Evans. Labourdonnais, on the other hand, was comparatively unacquainted with this new style of play, and although unfortunate in the first encounter, deserves great credit for the skill and patience with which he elaborated the defence in subsequent games.
4...Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5
Ledger: Our readers are all aware that there has long existed a difference of opinion among good players as to the relative advantages of 5...Ba5 and 5...Bc5. The latter move, in our opinion, affords a more satisfactory defence than any at the second player's choice.
6.0-0
Ledger: This was considered White's best play until after the death of both these illustrious chess athletes. Later analysis has proved 6.d4, followed by 7.0-0, etc., to be the strongest line of attack at this juncture.
6...d6
Ledger: 6...Nf6 is the correct move. If, in reply, White advances 7.d4, Black replies with 7.0-0, and will preserve a safe and well developed game.
7.d4 Bb6
CPC: 7...exd5 would have been better play.
Studies: 7...exd5.
Ledger: Black should have captured 7...exd5 before retreating the bishop to b6.
8.dxe5
Bell's: For if 8...dxe5, 9.Qxd8+, and win a pawn.
8...Bg4 9.Bb5
CPC: By taking 9.exd6, and, if the adversary had taken the pawn, playing 10.Qb3, White might have obtained a fine position.
9...Bxf3 10.Qxf3 dxe5 11.Qg3 Qf6 12.Bg5
CPC: 12.Kh1 with the object of advancing 13.f4, would perhaps have been more effective than the present move.
12...Qe6 13.Na3 Nf6 14.Bxf6 gxf6
Ledger: To have retaken with queen, would have been better play. Suppose 14...Qxf6 15.Nc4 0-0 16.Bxc6 Qxc6 17.Nxe5 Qe6 (best). The game is quite even. Had Black, in this variation, captured 17...Qxe4, he must have lost the exchange as White would have moved 18.Nd7.
15.Rad1 Bc5
CPC: We should have preferred playing 15...Ke7.
16.Qg7 Ke7
Ledger: A mistake which costs him the exchange. He should have moved 16...Rf8.
17.Bc4
Bell's: This move tells tremendously; for, if he remove queen, you capture f7-pawn.
CPC: This part of the game is well played by White.
17...Rag8 18.Qxg8 Rxg8 19.Bxe6 fxe6 20.Nc2 Rg4 21.Rfe1 f5 22.exf5 exf5 23.Ne3 Bxe3 24.Rxe3 Ke6 25.Rh3 Rg7 26.Rh6+ Ke7 27.Rb1 Nd8 28.f3
Bell's: We think it would be more forward play to move 28.Rb5, which would smash him "instanter."
28...b6 29.Rd1 Nf7
CPC: Badly played.
Ledger: Had the knight been played to e6, White would have equally have won by 30.Rd5.
30.Rc6 Rg8 31.Rxc7+ Kf6 32.Rxa7 Rc8 33.Rdd7
Bell's: The second player managed his opening badly, and being forced to lose the exchange to prevent further mischief, had little remaining chance. White's move are very nicely calculated all along, and we only wish we had a few more players of the same high excellence; but in chess, as in other things, a large proportion of the world are too content with mediocrity—dull, ditch-watery, and detestable.
33...Ng5 34.Rdc7 1-0
CPC: The defense of the second player, in this partie is not be be commended; but it must be borne in mind, that at this period when M. De la Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell played their match, Captain Evans's Gambit was little if at all known to the Parisian Amateurs, and that the present was probably the first occasion on which M. De la Bourdonnais had ever experienced the force of this ingenious opening in the hands of a skilful player.

Selection Of Games Played In The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.2 (27)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [A03] Bird
1.f4
Ledger: A very good opening, when an irregular game is sought.
1...d5 2.d4 c5 3.e3 Nc6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.c4 Bg4 6.cxd5 Bxf3 7.Qxf3 Qxd5 8.Qxd5 Nxd5 9.Bb5 cxd4 10.exd4
Ledger: He should first have taken 10.Bxc6 in order to leave his adversary with two isolated pawns on the queen's side.
10...Nb4 11.Na3 0-0-0 12.Bxc6 Nxc6 13.Be3 Nxd4 14.0-0-0 e5
Ledger: This was uncalled for; we can see no possible objection to 14...Nc6.
15.Nc4
CPC: La Bourdonnais would have done better, we believe, by taking 15.fxe5 at once.
Ledger: Badly played. The simple move 15.fxe5 would equalize the game.
15...Bc5 16.Bxd4
Ledger: Labourdonnais seems bent on compelling his adversary to score this game. Here, again, he ought evidently to have taken 16.fxe5.
16...exd4 17.Rhe1 f6 18.Re6 Rhe8 19.Rde1 Rxe6 20.Rxe6 Kd7
CPC: A good move.
21.f5 Re8 22.Rxe8 Kxe8
23.Kc2 Kd7 24.Kd3 Kc6 25.Ke4
Bell's: This is a fine piece of elementary matter, and, in working out similar ends of games, we would back the amateur who played the black pieces against any player who ever lived, not excepting Philidor himself. Need we add, that the game before us was won of Monsieur De La Bourdonnais by Mr. M—, the first English player?
25...Kb5 26.Nd2 Kb4 27.Kd3 Bd6 28.Nf3 Be5 29.h4
CPC: If White had taken 29.Nxd4, his opponent would doubtless have taken 29...Bxh2 in preference to exchanging the pieces.
29...Kc5 30.Ke4 h5 31.Nd2 b5 32.Nb3+ Kc4 33.Na5+ Kb4 34.Nc6+ Kc4 35.Na5+
Bell's: White dare not take 35.Nxa7 on account of the threatened advance of 35...d3. Did our limits permit, we could make a note on each of these moves, which are played by both parties in the most scientific manner.
35...Kb4 36.Nc6+ Kc5 37.Na5 b4 38.Nb3+ Kc4 39.Nd2+ Kb5 40.b3
Studies: Knight moves.
Ledger: 40.Nb3 would have drawn the game. Labourdonnais was not himself in this encounter.
40...a5 41.Kd5 Bf4
CPC: Well played.
42.Nc4 d3 43.Nb2 d2 44.Ke4 Be5 45.Nd1 Bg3
Bell's: A home thrust.
46.Ke3 Be1
Bell's: He can take the pawn-h4 at any time. It can't run away.
47.Ke2 Kc5 48.Ne3 Kd4 49.Nc4
Bell's: If 49.Nc2+ and 50.Nxe1, Black wins by capturing the pawns on the queen's side with king.
CPC: It would have been imprudent of White to have checked 49.Nc2+, and then exchanged his knight for the bishop and pawn, because his adversary must have gained the pawns on the queen's side immediately.
49...Kc3 50.Kd1 a4 51.Na5 axb3 52.axb3 Bxh4
Bell's: White here surrendered on terms of honourable capitulation. He has defended himself as well as it was possible for man to do against a superiority both of power and position. One is apt to think he might have at one time drawn it during the latter part of the contest; but we believe this to be a fallacy, however difficult to disprove.
53.Nc4 Bg5 0-1
CPC: This game is played by Mr. M'Donnell throughout with great spirit and judgment.

Games Played By The Leading Players Of The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.3 (28)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 Nc6 3.Nf3 e6 4.c3 d5 5.e5 f6 6.Na3 Nh6 7.Nc2 Qb6 8.d4 cxd4 9.cxd4
CPC: We should have preferred taking 9.Ncxd4.
9...Bb4+ 10.Kf2 Bd7 11.h4
CPC: The opening of this game is very ill played by the first player.
Ledger: For comments on the opening we refer the reader to the games previously published in the Ledger.
11...fxe5 12.fxe5 0-0 13.Kg3
Bell's: White has certainly played in a very odd manner, to say the least of it, thus to place his king in the van of the battle.
Ledger: White here declines to exchange 13.Bxh6, and, considering the winning position he very soon obtains, we must pronounce the line of play adopted instead, to have been the correct one.
13...Nf5+ 14.Kh3 Be7 15.Bd3 Qd8
Bell's: He would lose the game to take d-pawn with knight.
16.g4
Bell's: Here is some really beautiful play, as will be presently more clearly developed.
CPC: 16.Bg5 would have been sounder play.
Ledger: Very well played.
16...Nxh4
Palamède: Ce P est fort dangereux à prendre, et les noirs compromettent ici leur partie. {This is very dangerous pawn to take, and Black jeopardizes his game here.}
Ledger: An injudicious capture, courted by his adversary and which ought to have resulted in Black's defeat. 16...Nh6 would have been preferable, though still leaving the advantage with the first player.
17.Nxh4 Bxh4 18.g5
Bell's: These moves formed, of course, part of the calculation when White gave up h-pawn, and mark the real Chess style.
Palamède: Coup très-bien joué. {Very well played move.}
18...Bxg5 19.Qh5
Ledger: White has now acquired a winning position.
19...Bh6
Ledger: If 19...h6 20.Rg1 (best) 20...Bxc1 21.Rxg7+ Kxg7 22.Qg6+ Kh8 23.Qh7#. Black may, of course, vary his 19th move but it will be found that, in no case, can defeat be averted.
20.Bxh6
CPC: Had White, instead of this move, played 20.Rg1, we believe he could have won the game; for if Black, on his so playing, moved 20...Kh8, apparently his only way to save a piece, White by taking 21.Rxg7, wins easily: Black, however, instead of moving his king, might play 20...Qe8 or 20...Be8, but White would still take 21.Rxg7+.
Studies: 20.Rg1.
Ledger: M'Donnell does not here select the best move. 20.Rg1 was the coup juste, and must have speedily forced the game. Suppose 20.Rg1 Kh8 (best) 21.Rxg7 21...Rf3+ (21...Kxg7, White mates in four moves) 22.Kg2 (best) 22...Rxd3 23.Qxh6, winning easily.
20...gxh6 21.Rag1+
Studies: Rhg1+.
21...Kh8 22.Qxh6
Palamède: A la première vue ce coup parait bon, mais en examinant avec soin la position, l'on verra qu'il est très-faible. Il permet aux noirs de se tirer d'une très-mauvaise position. Au lieu de ce coup, les blancs devaient prendre le second P de la T avec leur F du R, et ils auraient gagné forcément. {At first glance this move seems good, but by carefully examining the position, we will see that it is very weak. It allows Black to get out of a very bad position. Instead of this, White should take 22.Bxh7, and inevitably he would have won.}
CPC: By taking 22.Bxh7, White would have had an improved position.
Studies: 22.Bxh7.
Ledger: White should have continued thus: 22.Bxh7 Qe7 (best) 23.Bd3, and wins.
22...Qe7 23.Rg3
Ledger: Again 23.Bxh7 was the correct play. 23.Bxh7 Qxh7 (23...Rf3+ 24.Kg2, winning) 24.Qxh7+ Kxh7 25.Rg3, and wins at once.
23...Rg8 24.Qf6+
Bell's: Wrong. You should take 24.Bxh7; for, if 24...Qxh7 25.Qxh7+ Kxh7 26.Kg2#.
Studies: 24.Bxh7 Rxg3+ 25.Kxg3 Qg7+ 26.Bg6+ Qxh6 27.Rxh6+ Kg7 28.Rh7+ Kxg6 29.Rxd7 wins.
Ledger: M'Donnell might even now have captured 24.Bxh7, though not with the same effect as on the preceding moves. The check here given was one of the worst moves at his disposal, it enables Black at once to relieve himself from all embarrassment by an exchange of queens.
24...Qxf6 25.exf6 e5+ 26.Kg2 e4 27.Be2 Rxg3+ 28.Kxg3 Rg8+ 29.Kh4
Bell's: You have suffered the golden moment to escape, and now you'll smart for it.
29...Rg2 30.Rf1 Kg8
Ledger: White, the reader need hardly be told, would immediately queen his advanced pawn, were his antagonist to capture the bishop.
31.Bd1 Be6 32.b4 a6 33.a4 Rh2+ 34.Kg5 b5 35.axb5 axb5 36.Bh5
Bell's: As the game is evidently bad, White ventures all upon a desperate attack.
Palamède: Les blancs abandonnent une pièce pour prendre l'attaque et chercher une remise. {White drops a piece to take up the attack and seek a draw.}
Ledger: This is mere desperation; the game is now irretrievably lost.
36...Rxc2 37.Ra1 Nd8
Bell's: Correctly parried; for, if 38.Ra8, he can interpose 38...Rc8.
38.Ra7 e3 39.Rg7+ Kf8 40.Kh6 Nf7+ 41.Bxf7
Bell's: If 41.Kxh7 Bf5+ 42.Rg6 (if 42.Bg6, mate with rook. We only give this variation to show a curious stalemate which would occur on 42.Rg6, should he incautiously play 42...Rh2.) 42...Rg2 43.Bg4 Rh2+ (if 43...Rxg4, he gives stalemate.), 44.Bh3 (or 44.Bh5) and is checkmated instantly.
Studies: 41.Kxh7 Bf5+ 42.Rg6 Rg2 mating in three.
41...Bxf7
Bell's: White resigns. His ingenious play in the commencement deserved a better fate. These games exemplify the tremendous manner in which La Bourdonnais wields the attack. Like the fox in the fable, let him get his tail in, and he'll soon introduce his whole body. He is decidedly the first player in Europe.
42.Rg3 Rh2+ 43.Kg5 e2 44.Re3 Bh5 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.4 (29)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [C54] Italian
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 d6
Ledger: We have, in a note to one of the preceding contests, taken occasion to remind the student that 4...Nf6, is here the correct reply. 4...d6 enables the first player to obtain the better game through the establishment of his pawns in the centre.
5.d3
Ledger: 5.d4 was the coup juste, and, properly followed up, would have given him a slightly superior position.
5...Nf6 6.b4 Bb6 7.a4 a6 8.b5 Ne7 9.h3 Ng6 10.Qe2 Be6 11.Na3 0-0 12.g4
Ledger: This style of play adopted by Labourdonnais in the game before us, cannot be commended. It is far too bold and reckless to be ventured upon with an adversary of equal force, and, as in this instance, generally results in defeat.
12...d5 13.Ba2 dxe4 14.dxe4 Bxa2 15.Rxa2 Nd7 16.Nc4 Re8 17.h4 Nc5 18.Rd2 Qc8 19.Rd5 Nxa4 20.h5 Nf4
Ledger: Well played; Black must now win the exchange. To have taken c-pawn with the other knight would have been bad play. Suppose 20...Nxc3 21.Qd3 Nxd5 22.hxg6 Nf6 (best) 23.gxf7+ Kxf7 24.Qb3 and must win.
21.Bxf4 Nxc3
CPC: Very well played.
22.Qd3 Nxd5 23.Qxd5 exf4 24.Ng5 Re7 25.h6 g6 26.Nxb6 cxb6 27.Qd4 Qf8 28.Qf6 Rd7 29.Ke2 Rad8 30.e5 Rd2+ 31.Kf1 Rxf2+
CPC: A masterly move.
Ledger: Very well played; this sacrifice forces the game.
32.Kxf2 Qc5+ 33.Kg2 Rd2+ 34.Kh3 Qe3+ 35.Nf3
Ledger: If 35.Kh4, Black mates 35...Qg3#.
35...Qxf3+ 36.Kh4 Qxh1+ 37.Kg5 Kf8
CPC: The following mode of play would have been safer: 37...Qxh6+ 38.Kxh6 Rh2+ 39.Kg5 h6+ 40.Kxf4 Rf2+ 41.K-any Rxf6 42.exf6 a5, winning easily.
Studies: 37...Qxh6+.
Ledger: The following line of play, indicated by another commentator, would have been far more expeditious: 37...Qxh6+ 38.Kxh6 Rh2+ 39.Kg5 h6+ 40.Kxf4 Rf2+ 41.K-any Rxf6 42.exf6 a5, winning.
38.Qh8+ Ke7 39.Qf6+ Ke8 40.Qh8+ Kd7 41.e6+ fxe6 42.Qg7+ Kd6 43.Qf8+ Kc7 44.Qxf4+ Rd6 45.Qf7+ Kc8 46.Qg8+ Rd8 47.Qxh7 Qd5+ 48.Kh4 Qh1+ 49.Kg5 Rd5+ 50.Kf6 Qf3+ 51.Kxe6 Qe4+ 52.Kf6 Qe5+ 0-1

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.5 (30)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [C24] Bishop's Opening
1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nf6 3.d4
CPC: 3.Nf3 would also have been a good move.
Ledger: 3.Nf3 is now generally preferred at this point, and leads to an interesting game. Black's reply is 3...Nxe4, or 3...Nc6. If the former be adopted 4.Nc3 on White's part, a move first brought in vogue by Mr. Boden, undoubtedly the strongest English player of the present day, affords a scope for positions of peculiar interest. Should Black decline the capture of the e-pawn, and move 3...Nc6, the opening is resolved into the "Two Knights' Game," White's rejoinder being 4.Ng5, or better, perhaps, 4.d4.
3...exd4
CPC: Badly played; he should have moved 3...c6.
4.e5 Qe7
Palamède: Mauvais coup; les noirs débutent mal cette partie, et les blancs ont constamment l'avantage. {Bad move; Black starts this game poorly, and White has a continual advantage.}
Ledger: A bad move, resulting in loss of time and position. 4...d5, Black's accepted play, would have given him the better opening.
5.Qe2 Ng8
Ledger: Compulsory. Had Black now played 5...d5, he would evidently have lost a piece, as White would have captured 6.exf6, and on Black's exchanging 6...Qxe2+, (his best move,) would have retaken with 7.Bxe2.
6.Nf3 Nc6 7.c3 d6 8.cxd4 Bg4 9.Bb5 d5 10.Nc3 Qe6 11.h3 Bxf3 12.Qxf3 0-0-0 13.Bxc6 Qxc6
Ledger: Surely 13...bxc6 would have been far better. The uncovering of his king was a matter of small consequence compared to the loss of his valuable f-pawn and the "passing" of his adversary's advanced center pawn. The loss of the game may be ascribed to the heedless move here made by Labourdonnais.
14.Qxf7 Bb4 15.Bd2 Ne7 16.0-0 Rdf8 17.Qh5 Nf5 18.a3 Bxc3 19.Bxc3 g6 20.Qd1 h5 21.Rc1 Qe6 22.f4 h4
CPC: Black might have gained "the exchange" by playing 22...Ne3.
23.Rf3 Rfg8 24.Qe1 Kb8 25.Qd2 Rh7 26.Qd3 Rhg7 27.Bd2
Ledger: Preventing the threatened advance of the g-pawn.
27...a6 28.b4 Qb6 29.Bc3
Studies: 29.Rc5.
Ledger: This bishop was well posted, and should not have been withdrawn from the diagonal it occupied. 29.Rc5 as suggested by Mr. Walker, would have done White better service.
29...Ng3 30.a4 Ne4 31.b5 g5
Ledger: Black now gains an opening on the adverse king, but his attack fails, and the strength of White's passed center pawns becomes irresistible.
32.f5 g4 33.hxg4 Rxg4 34.Rc2 h3
CPC: 34...Ng4 would probably have been better play.
Ledger: Labourdonnais's management of the latter part of this game is very ingenious, but the crushing force of M'Donnell's pawns tells heavily throughout this termination.
35.Rxh3 Rg3 36.Rxg3 Rxg3 37.a5
CPC: An ingenious move: had Black taken 37...Rxd3, and afterwards 38...Rxc3, he could not have prevented his opponent "queening" the f-pawn.
Ledger: Very well played.
37...Qh6
Palamède: Les noirs pouvaient gagner une pièce, mais ils n'auraient plus été à temps pour arrèter la marche des P. {Black could win a piece, but he would not have time to stop the march of the pawn.}
Ledger: 37...Rxd3 would have won a piece, but could not have saved the game. Suppose 37...Rxd3 38.axb6:
A) 38...Nxc3 39.Rxc3 Rxc3 40.f6 and will easily queen one of his pawns.
B) 38...Rxc3 39.Rxc3 Nxc3 40.e6 (best) 40...Ne4 (best) 41.e7 Nf6 (best) 42.g4 Kc8 (best) 43.bxa6 (best; the line of play beginning with White's 43rd move is the only road to victory. Should he move 43.g5, Black would draw by 43...cxb6, and on White's capturing the knight, moving 44...Kd7. We recommend this study to the student's attention; it will amply repay perusal) 43...bxa6 (best) 44.b7+ (Here again, should White incautiously advance 44.g5, Black would secure a drawn battle by taking 44...cxb6, and moving 45...Kd7 on White's capturing his knight) 44...Kxb7 45.g5 (The advance of the g-pawn now forces the game, the black king having been removed one square by the sacrifice of the b-pawn) 45...Ne8 46.f6, winning. White might also have won by 40.f6, but not as prettily.
These variations contain a number of others which we must omit, after commending them to the patient study of amateurs.
38.Bd2 Qh3 39.Qf1 Rg8 40.f6 Qh4 41.f7 Rf8 42.e6 Ng3 43.Qf3 Qh1+ 44.Kf2 Ne4+ 45.Ke2 Qb1 46.e7 Qxb5+ 47.Qd3 Ng3+ 48.Kd1 1-0
Studies: Suppose: 48...Qxd3 49.exf8Q+ Ka7 50.Qc5+ b6, mates in two.
Ledger: This game is finely played throughout by M'Donnell. His play in these matches, unfortunately, does not appear to have been as uniformly sustained as that of his great competitor.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.6 (31)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5
Palamède: C'est un fort bon coup, si les blancs voulaient gagner le pion; les noirs, en échangeant les reines et dégageant de suite leurs pièces, auraient une forte attaque. {This is a very good move, if White want to capture the pawn; Black, exchanging queens and clearing away the pieces, would have a strong attack.}
4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Be7
Palamède: Le fou à la 3e case de la reine eût été mieux joué. {6...Bd6 was better play.}
CPC: 6...Bd6 we think preferable.
Ledger: See, for remarks on the opening, the Queen's Gambits previously published in the Ledger.
7.Nf3 0-0 8.0-0 c6
Palamède: Les noirs, en poussant ce pion, puis jouant leur cavalier de la reine à la 2e case de la reine, et ensuite à sa 3e case, ont pour but de masquer le fou du roi de leur adversaire; mais pour atteindre ce but, ils perdent beaucoup de temps. Quoique cette manière de jouer ait été indiquée par Philidor, je la crois mauvaise. {Black, pushing the pawn and then playing Nbd7-c6, intended to harass the opponent's bishop; but to achieve this goal, he loses too much time. Although this style of play had been recommended by Philidor, I believe it bad.}
9.h3 Nbd7 10.Be3 Nb6 11.Bb3 Nfd5 12.Qe2 Kh8 13.Rae1 Bd6 14.Bc2 f5 15.Ne5 f4
Palamède: Coup très-dangereux pour les noirs. {Very dangeroups move for Black.}
CPC: The injudicious advance of this pawn gives White an overwhelming attack.
Ledger: M'Donnell's favorite advance of the f-pawn in these games. Labourdonnais cleverly takes advantage of this mistake, and thus early may be said to have a winning position.
16.Qh5
Palamède: Ce coup de la part des blancs est profondément calculé. {This move from White is deeply calculated.}
16...Nf6
Palamède: Les noirs ont cru gagner une pièce. {Black thought he was winning a piece.}
17.Ng6+ Kg8 18.Bb3+ Nbd5 19.Nxd5
Palamède: Cette position est fort curieuse; les blancs ont quatre pièces en prise, et cependant fort beau jeu. Si les noirs prenaient la reine ou le cavalier du roi ou le fou, ils seraient échec et mat par un double échec. {This position is very curious. White has four pieces en prise, yet it is very beautiful. If Black took the queen or knight at g6 or bishop, he would be mated by a double check.}
19...cxd5
CPC: If Black had taken 19...Nxh5, he would have been mated next move by the double check.
Ledger: He would evidently have been mated on the next move, had he capture his adversary's queen.
20.Bxd5+ Nxd5 21.Qxd5+ Rf7 22.Ne5 Be6
Palamède: Pour ne pas perdre l'échange d'une tour contre un cavalier. {To avoid losing the exchange of rook for knight.}
23.Qxe6 Bxe5 24.dxe5 fxe3 25.Rxe3
Ledger: The series of moves, beginning with his sixteenth, has been capitally played by Labourdonnais, and the result is a clear gain of two pawns. All interest in the game is now at an end, victory being a mere question of time.
25...Qe8 26.Qxe8+ Rxe8 27.f4 Rc7 28.Rf2 Kf7 29.g4 Rc5 30.Rfe2 a5 31.Kf2 b5 32.Kf3 b4 33.a3 Rb8 34.axb4 Rxb4 35.Rc3 1-0

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.7 (32)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 e6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.c3 d5 5.e5 f6 6.Na3 Nh6 7.Nc2 Qb6 8.d4 Bd7 9.h4 cxd4 10.cxd4 Nf5
Ledger: He ought rather to have checked 10...Bb4+, as in the other games.
11.Kf2 h5 12.g3 0-0-0 13.Kg2 Be7 14.a3 Be8 15.b4 Kb8 16.b5 Na5 17.Ne3 Bg6 18.Bd3 Nxe3+ 19.Bxe3 Be4 20.Bxe4 dxe4 21.Nd2 fxe5 22.fxe5 Qxb5
Palamède: La prise de ce pion donne beau jeu aux noirs. {Taking this pawn gives Black a beautiful game.}
23.Qf1 Qd3 24.Qxd3 exd3 25.Rhb1 Rc8 26.Kf3 Rc3 27.Rb5 Bd8 28.Ke4 a6 29.Rbb1 Be7 30.a4
Studies: 31.Rb6.
Ledger: This is a mere loss of time. He should have moved 31.Rb6 at once.
30...Rd8 31.Rb6 Rc6 32.Rab1 Kc7 33.Rxc6+ Nxc6 34.Rf1 Bb4 35.Rf7+ Rd7 36.Rxd7+ Kxd7 37.Nf3 Be7 38.Kxd3 Nb4+ 39.Ke4
Studies: 39.K c-file.
Ledger: White's left wing is weaker than his antagonist's, who has two pawns to one on that side of the board. Under these circumstances it would have been better play to have moved the king in that direction. 39.Kc4, was the correct play.
39...Nd5 40.Bd2 b5 41.axb5 axb5 42.Kd3 Ke8 43.Bg5 Bxg5 44.Nxg5 Kd7 45.Ne4 Kc6 46.Nc5 Nc7 47.Ke4
Ledger: 47.Ne4 was the proper move, and would have rendered Black's victory very uncertain.
47...b4 48.Kd3
Ledger: 48.Nxe6, the move intended, we suppose, when the king was played to e4, would have been of no avail. Suppose, 48.Nxe6 Nxe6 (best) 49.d5+ Kd7 50.dxe6+ Kxe6 51.Kd4 b3 52.Kc3 Kxe5 53.Kxb3 Kf5, and wins.
48...Kd5 49.Ne4 Nb5 50.g4 hxg4 51.h5
Ledger: If 51.Nf6+ gxf6 52.h5:
A) 52...b3 53.h6 Nxd4 54.Kc3 (Should White play 54.h7, Black replied with 54...b2 and will mate in a few moves) 54...Ne2+ 55.Kxb3 Nf4 56.h7 Ng6 57.exf6 Kd6 winning.
B) 52...fxe5 53.h6 Nd6 54.h7 Nf7 winning.
51...Nxd4 52.h6 gxh6 53.Nf6+ Kxe5 54.Nxg4+ Kd5 0-1
CPC: This game is extremely well played by M. De la Bourdonnais.

Games Played By The Leading Players Of The Westminster Chess Club.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.8 (33)
White: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Black: McDonnell,A
Opening: [D20] Queen's Gambit Accepted
1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4 Nf6 6.Nf3 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.h3 Nbd7 9.Nc3 Nb6 10.Bb3 c6 11.Be3 Nfd5
Ledger: For comments on the opening moves, see the games at the same debut previously published in the Ledger.
12.Qe2 f5 13.Rae1 f4
CPC: 13...Kh8, we think, would have preferable.
Studies: 13...Kh8.
Ledger: A heedless move, that throws away a clear pawn. 13...Kh8 would have been better play.
14.Bxf4 Rxf4 15.Qxe7 Qxe7 16.Rxe7 Kf8 17.Re4
CPC: In Greenwood Walker's collection of the games between M. De la Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell, this move is printed "R. to K.'s fifth;" an error which, as it is far from obvious, and detracts materially from the merit of the subsequent moves, we have thought it necessary to point out.
17...Rf6
Bell's: Examine what would be the result of 17...Bxh3.
18.Nxd5 cxd5 19.Re3 Bf5 20.Ne5 h6
Bell's: This appears to be feeble sort of play.
CPC: 20...Rc8 would have been better play.
21.Rc1 Rd8 22.Rc7 Bc8 23.Rg3 Bd7 24.Bxd5
CPC: This and the succeeding moves are well played by M. De la Bourdonnais.
24...Nxd5 25.Rxd7 Rxd7 26.Nxd7+ 1-0
Bell's: White outplays his adversary throughout the game. The final "coup de grace" is given with good judgment.
Ledger: A short contest, indifferently played throughout by M'Donnell, and presenting no point of interest.

In the Match between M. De La Bourdonnais and Mr. M'Donnell.

Date: 1834
Site: ENG London
Event: Westminster Chess Club, Second Match
Round: 2.9 (34)
White: McDonnell,A
Black: Mahé,LC (de la Bourdonnais)
Opening: [B21] Sicilian
1.e4 c5 2.f4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.e5 Nc6 5.c3 f6 6.Na3 Nh6 7.Nc2 Qb6 8.d4 Bd7 9.h4 0-0-0 10.a3 Kb8 11.b4
Palamède: Les noirs ont fait une faute de roquer trop promptement; les blancs poussent ee P pour découvrir le R adverse. {Black too readily castled incorrectly; the white pawn push exposes the adverse king.}
11...cxd4 12.cxd4 Nf5 13.Kf2 h5 14.Bd3 Nh6
Palamède: Prendre la P eût fait perdre la pièce. {Taking the pawn would lose a piece.}
CPC: If Black had taken 14...Nfxd4, White would have played 15.Be3.
Ledger: Had Black captured 14...Ncxd4, White would have replied with 15.Ncxd4, followed by 16.Be3, winning a piece.
15.Bd2 Ng4+ 16.Kg3 Rc8 17.Qe2 Be7 18.a4 g5
Palamède: A leur tour les noirs cherchent à former une attaque sur le R de l'adversaire. {It is now Black's turn to attempt an attack on the opponent's king.}
19.a5 Qc7 20.b5 gxf4+ 21.Kh3 Nxd4
Palamède: Au lieu de rentrer ce C, les noirs préfèrent le sacrifier pour avoir de beaux pions au centre. {Instead of retreating this knight, Black prefers the sacrifice to have beautiful center pawns.}
22.Ncxd4 fxe5 23.b6 Qd6 24.Nxe5
Lewis: 24.Rhb1 is a better move.
Palamède: La T du R à la c. du C de la D étant le coup juste. {24.Rhb1 is the correct move.}
Studies: 24.Rhb1 wins.
Ledger: 24.Rhb1 has justly been pronounced White's best play at this juncture. The move is fruitful of interesting variations, and would, we think, have left the advantage with the first player.
24...Qxe5 25.Qxe5+ Nxe5 26.Bxf4 Bd6 27.Bb5 Rc3+ 28.g3 Bc8 29.bxa7+ Ka8 30.a6 bxa6
Lewis: I think, if instead of this move he had played 30...Nf7, he would have had the best of the game.
Palamède: La prise de ce P fait perdre les noirs. Au lieu de prendre, ils auraient dû jouer le C à la 2 c. du F du R, et ils auraient eu boune partie. {Black loses by taking this pawn. Instead of taking, he should play 30...Nf7, and he would have had a good game.}
Studies: 30...Nf7.
Ledger: Black should at once have retreated 30...Nf7, and must then have won through the strength of his passed centre pawns.
31.Bxa6 Nf7 32.Bxd6 Nxd6 33.Bxc8 Rhxc8 34.Nxe6 Ne4 35.Rhg1 Nf2+
Lewis: 35...Rc2 is probably better.
Palamède: La T à la 7 c. du F de la D était préférable. {35...Rc2 was preferable.}
Studies: 35...Rc2.
Ledger: 35...Rc2 was the correct play.
36.Kg2 Ng4 37.Rgb1 Rc2+ 38.Kg1 Ne5 39.Ra3 Rc1+ 40.Rxc1 Rxc1+ 41.Kg2 Rc2+ 42.Kf1 Rc6 43.Nf4 d4 44.Ke2 Rc2+ 45.Kd1 Rc4 46.Nxh5 Ng4 47.Nf4 Ne3+ 48.Ke2 Nf5 49.Nd5 Nxg3+ 50.Kf3 Rc6 51.Kxg3 1-0

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